Making Things, Doing Things

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On Thursday 26 October a gang of ‘digital curious’ museum folk discovered cheap and easy ways to start using technology at their museum. Led by Paul Clifford we made robots, programmed micro:bits and found the ‘Maker’ within us.

“Instead of learning about our technology we opt for a world in which our technology learns about us.” Douglas Rushkoff

 

The Maker Movement

The Maker Movement is a global community of people making and sharing their objects through events and the internet. A ‘Maker’ might build furniture, bake cakes or engineer robots but, whatever the activity, at the core of the Maker Movement is a belief in democratisation, social learning, collaboration and self-empowerment.

For Makers who are interested in digital technology, they might enjoy electronics, robotics, 3-D printing blended with more traditional crafts like metalworking, woodworking, arts and crafts. A Maker might build something from scratch or tinker with existing technology.

The Kit

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Makey Makey – have you ever wanted to make a banana piano or turn your hands into buttons? Then the Makey Makey is the kit for you! The Makey Makey is a simple circuit board onto which you can attach crocodile clips to turn anything into a button. Cost: £50 approx.

micro:bit – a microcontroller that you can simply programme to do different things, like direct motors, flash lights or play sounds. Using the MakeCode.org website you can programme a micro:bit really easily following the instructions on the micro:bit website. In 2016 the BBC distributed a micro:bit to every year 7 child in Britain, so many schools already have a supply of these. Cost: £12 approx.

Servo:Lite – a type of servoboard. A servoboard is a device that controls motors or mechanisms (technically known as servomotors or servomechanisms), for example turning wheels, switching lights on and off or playing a noise. The Servo:Lite is controlled by the micro:bit (or other microcontroller).

ZIP Halo – a circular board that has a ring of flashing lights, which you can programme using the micro:bit. Cost: £12 approx.

Motor and wheels – moving wheels that you can attach to your Servo:Lite, which you can programme using your micro:bit. Cost: £8 approx.

Arduino – an electronics platform for making interactive projects. An Arduino senses the environment through sensors and you can tell an Arduino what to do by writing code in the Arduino programming language. Cost varies depending on what you buy.

Touch board – you can use this to turn any material or surface into a sensor, so you could paint a light switch on a wall, make a paper piano or create an interactive poster. Cost: £60 approx.

Raspberry Pi – a tiny, affordable computer that you can use to learn programming. You can plug it into a monitor and it comes with its own operating system. Cost: £30 – 40 approx.

Conductive Paint – you could use this to paint buttons or circuits.

Little:Bits – really simple electronic kit that lets you build circuits. Lots of fun to play with and great for absolute beginners.

Extras – crocodile clips, batteries, keyboards, monitors, copper tape, etc.

There are countless extras you could buy depending on what you’re interested in!

(Please note that these products are available from a range of sources.)

How can we use this technology in our museums?

Some museums are doing all kinds of amazing things – from massive digital projects to cheap and cheerful kids’ events. Here are some ideas to get you started:

Build a Robot – using craft materials, motor wheels, micro:bit and Servolite you can create simple robots that wheel around and draw shapes.

Maker Trolley – short on space in your museum? No problem – why not try a trolley loaded with craft materials, and a few simple bits of technology to get kids playing.

Cardboard Instruments – cut out guitars and pianos from cardboard and use Makey Makeys to turn these into intruments. Check out the Makey Makey website for different ideas.

There are lots of blogs and websites full of ideas with easy to follow instruction. Check out the following for inspiration:

https://makezine.com/projects/

https://www.makerspaces.com/makerspace-ideas/

https://learn.adafruit.com/

https://www.kitronik.co.uk/blog/kitronik-university/

https://www.raspberrypi.org/education/

http://www.bbc.co.uk/connectedstudio/toolkit

https://situate.io/

https://smartify.org/

Don’t have the technology?

No problem – you can borrow the Essex Museum Development’s digital learning library for free.

Why not try contacting local businesses to ask if you can have their old computers, keyboards, tablets, etc if they’re throwing them away?

Contact Makers and technology producers to ask if they might loan you equipment or donate some to your museum. Check out the list below for ideas of who you might contact:

Raspberry Pi Foundation

BBC micro:bits

Mini Maker Foundation

Your local ‘Code Club’ or local Makers

Crafts Council (also potential funders!)

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If you’re interested in using digital technology but aren’t sure where to get started, come along to the next Heritage Education Group meeting where we will be playing with the technology library. We will be meeting on Tuesday 5 December at the Essex Records Office. Contact me for more information and to book.

What on earth is GDPR and how does it effect you?

I attended SHARE’s fantastic Data Savvy Fundraising at Ipswich Museum on 18.10.2017, which explored the impact of GDPR legislation. They have another training day coming up on 7.12.2017 at Epping Forest District Museum, click here to find out more and book.

The Association of Independent Museums has published guidance for small museums – click here to access this. In addition to this, I wanted to share a few tips to get you started on thinking about the changes you might need to make before the new legislation comes into force on May 25 2018.

First, the lingo…

Glossary:

GDPR – General Data Protection Regulation, legislation for how we process and store data about people

PECR – Privacy and Electronic Communications Regulations 2003, additional governance for electronic communications including emails, text and mobile phone calls

Data Subject – the person who the data is about

Data Controller – the individual or organisation that is in control of who processes data and why the data is processed (e.g. trustees, museum employees)

Data Processor – the individual or organisations tasked with processing the data on behalf of the Data Controller (this would exclude museum employees but includes volunteers)

Personal Data – defined as “Any information relating to an identified or identifiable natural person.” This means data or combinations of data from which a person (not organisation) can be identified

Sensitive Personal Data – this is personal data, which relates to an individual’s race/ethnicity, religious beliefs, political opinions, mental/physical health, sex life, criminal history and trade union membership

ICO – Information Commissioner’s Officer, the UK’s independent data protection regulator

How will it affect you?

General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) comes into place on May 25 2018 with no transition period. This legislation protects all kinds of personal and sensitive personal data and has been adopted by the UK through the Data Protection Bill so will not be effected by Brexit.

This means that all data you hold about people will have to meet this new standard or be deleted. BUT don’t panic! With a few straightforward steps you will be able to meet this new standard.

What’s it all about?

If you hold data about a person they have the right to know what data you have, access the data, rectify incorrect data, delete all data about themselves, restrict your use of their data, obtain and reuse data and refuse consent to use their data.

The key principles are that data should be:

  1. Accurate and kept up to date
  2. Kept for no longer than is necessary for the purpose it was collected
  3. Processed in a way that ensures appropriate security

The Data Controller (i.e. your museum) is responsible for ensuring that these requirements are met. In order to demonstrate that you are meeting the requirements of GDPR you must:

  1. Implement appropriate measures to ensure you comply with legislation
  2. Keep a record of how you’ve processed data
  3. If appropriate, appoint a person responsible for ensuring compliance (only appropriate for larger organisation)

There are different legal conditions that allow organisations to hold and process personal data but the main two that apply to museums are consent and legitimate interest.

Consent

Consent means that the person has explicitly agreed to you holding their data and using it for specific purposes. Consent has to be used to emails, text messages, mobile phone calls, house phone calls if the person is listed on the Telephone Preference Service and for processing sensitive personal data (see glossary).

Consent must be:

  1. freely given (you can’t offer incentives or force someone)
  2. specific to how you plan to use their data
  3. informed
  4. unambiguous
  5. clear, affirmative action (i.e. you can’t use ‘opt out’ options)
  6. demonstrable (you must be able to prove that the person gave their consent if asked)

Consent doesn’t necessarily last for forever and should be refreshed at appropriate intervals. The GDPR doesn’t give an exact time frame, but every 24 months is recommended. Consent expires when the purpose for which you collected the data ends. For example if you hold someone’s details because they’re a volunteer, when they stop volunteering you must delete the data, unless you request permission to keep the data for another reason.

Example consent form:Example consent

(From ‘A practical guide to lawful fundraising for arts and cultural organisations’, June 2017, by BWB and ACE. Click here to access the full document.)

Data you have previously collected must meet this new standard. If it does not, you can ask for consent or you must delete this data. There is no such thing as implied consent.

Legitimate Interest

Please note that any local authority or university museums cannot use Legitimate Interest as a reason for holding personal data. This is explicitly banned in the GDPR.

Organisations that are not managed by a local authority or university can use Legitimate Interest to justify handling data without consent when the data processing is ‘necessary’ for the legitimate interest of the data controller (i.e. the museum). Your organisation has a necessary legitimate interest when using the data achieves an organisational objective (this is vague and will probably be tested in court).

Before you use Legitimate Interest you must ask yourself:

  1. Why this activity is important?
  2. Is processing the data is the only way of achieving your ‘necessary’ objective?
  3. If processing the data isn’t the only way to achieve the objective, why do you believe that handling the data is the most appropriate approach?

Whether or not you can use Legitimate Interest depends on the ‘reasonable expectation’ of the individual when they gave you the data. You must consider:

  1. What is the direct impact on the individual?
  2. Are the consequences for the individual positive?
  3. Is there a link between the original purpose that the data was given and how you want to use the data?
  4. What kind of data is being processed?
  5. Could your use of the data be considered obtrusive?

For example, if someone agreed to give you their address when they donated an object they might expect that you would contact them to ask a question about the object but they might not expect you to post them leaflets about all your museum events.

People can opt out of allowing you to use their data for legitimate interest.

You cannot use Legitimate Interest to contact people via email, text message or mobile phone call as this is governed by the PECR legislation. You can use Legitimate Interest to contact people by post or home phone call (provided their number isn’t listed on the Telephone Preference Service).

Privacy Policies

If you haven’t told someone how you’re going to use their data, you probably can’t use it. Your privacy policy sets out how you will use their data. A privacy policy should include:

  1. Who you are (identity and contact details of Data Controller)
  2. Why you want their data
  3. The legal basis for processing the data
  4. Who the data will be shared with
  5. How long the data will be held
  6. The person’s rights
  7. The right to withdraw consent
  8. The right to complain to the ICO
  9. The source of the data (if it’s not being provided by the person)
  10. Any automised data handling (for example wealth screening for fundraising purposes)

This is a lot of information for a person to take in! You might give this information at the point of consent being given, and it could be a link from your consent form (if you’re doing it online). This would look something like this:

privacy statement

(From ‘A practical guide to lawful fundraising for arts and cultural organisations’, June 2017, by BWB and ACE. Click here to access the full document.)

You can see examples of good and bad privacy policies if you click here.

What do you need to do?

  1. Don’t ignore it!
  2. Don’t work alone – make sure your whole team is on board
  3. Do audit your use of data
  4. Do write or review your privacy policy
  5. Do keep a record of your decisions

Need more information?

https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/data-protection-reform/overview-of-the-gdpr/

https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/guide-to-data-protection/privacy-notices-transparency-and-control/privacy-notices-in-practice/

http://www.artscouncil.org.uk/sites/default/files/download-file/A%20Practical%20Guide%20to%20Lawful%20Fundraising.pdf – practical examples of consent and privacy policies

https://2040infolawblog.com/

Learning & Engagement Grants For Essex Museums

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Essex Museum Development is offering grants of up to £500 to support the delivery of learning and community engagement using collections.

The grants aim to support local museums to:

  1. Develop relationships with local education providers including schools, colleges and home education groups
  2. Develop new learning and engagement resources
  3. Develop an adult learning offer
  4. Deliver activities which will reach new audiences
  5. Make their venue more accessible for disabled audiences

The funding scheme is open to any Accredited museum (or museum registered as Working Towards Accreditation) within the Essex or Southend-on-Sea local authority boundaries. Please note that to apply you must have attended at least two of the following training days:

It is important to read the guidance document before applying. It contains some suggestions as to what the grant can be used for, but this is not an exhaustive list. Please do get in contact if you wish to discuss your ideas.

To apply, complete this application form and return it to amy.cotterill@essex.gov.uk by 5pm on Tuesday 23rd January 2018

Learning and Engagement application guidance 2018

Click here to download the application form

 

New Audiences Day 2017

“Nothing without us about us is for us.”

This day explored the different ways in which we can engage with new audiences through case studies and group discussion. I’ve briefly summarised the presentations below but just get in touch if you’d like to know more.

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Young Roots – Dawn Bainbridge, Development Officer, Heritage Lottery Fund
Dawn discussed HLF’s Young Roots programme, covering how you can go about applying, what HLF look for and examples to inspire you. Successful projects focus on people learning skills in an in-depth and meaningful way. HLF have relaxed their rules about Young Roots projects being initiated by a group of young people, but they still must take the lead, e.g. steering group.

 You’re Doing It Already – embedding Arts Award into Museum Learning, Melissa Hawker, Learning Officer, Norfolk Museums Service
Melissa spoke about embedding Arts Award into school workshops and youth engagement projects, including Takeover Day and co-curating. The children shouldn’t feel like they are ‘writing up’ their log books, these should be treated as baskets to catch their learning and fill up naturally. Norfolk Museums Service run youth clubs starting from babies, which children taking more control of their learning as they develop. Starting early is a vital part of supporting young people to feel that the museum is a ‘place for them’. They do not advertise these groups in museums as the young people feel very strongly that the clubs are separate to schools and this is particularly important if school isn’t a positive experience. The youth clubs are free and this is key to their broad socio-economic appeal.

Engaging Diverse Local Audiences – Emma Winch, Heritage Learning Manager, Hackney Museum
Hackney Museum is internationally renowned for engaging diverse local audiences in the development of the museum and its exhibitions, programmes and projects that support audiences from all over the world to understand where their story fits within British history. Emma stated that there is no tool kit for engagement, you must employ the right people and work to a shared ethos. The most successful projects are not ones that ‘happen to’ community groups but where the community and the museum meet on mutual ground to create a relationship that grows into different projects. Hackney Museum supports local groups to campaign and Hackney Council often uses the museum as a space where people can have difficult conversations and community members come to council meetings. It’s important that changes made from their involvement is passed on to the community groups.

Diversifying your Audiences through Diversifying your Workforce – Rachel Macfarlane, Projects Development Officer, and Lib Fox, Museums Projects Officer, Colchester + Ipswich Museums
Colchester + Ipswich Museums shared a number of case studies from two years of Training Museum traineeships. The service has welcomed eleven Trainees from a variety of backgrounds, and they have helped us engage new audiences through work with schools and community groups, as well as social media. People who hadn’t considered working in museums before were targeted through the trainee recruitment. The applicants were asked to complete a very short form and submit a video and those shortlisted attended a group interview day with activities, discussion time and a very short interview. This more involved process provided greater insight into the attitudes of the individuals than the traditional format. In addition CIMS changed their volunteering to offer short, fixed-term posts with the application process making it clear what the volunteer would gain from their experience.

Jaywick Inspires – Kerith Ririe, Jaywick Martello Tower Manager
Jaywick Martello Tower supports creative collaborations relating to the themes of community, heritage and environment that affect our lives today. The Tower runs as an innovative arts, heritage and community space which successfully engages with its local community in Jaywick. The Tower Manager Kerith Ririe will discussed how the Tower has successfully engaged with its community and the plans for development. Many organisations are keen to work with Jaywick as it’s a well-known area of deprivation but the communities may not want to work with them. Jaywick Martello Tower offers food and refreshments at their activities to ensure that the participants aren’t hungry and better able to join in. How can we expect to engage an audience whose basic needs aren’t being met? The Tower used a cost benefit analysis tool to evidence that for every £1 invested, they reduced the spend in other services by £11.70.

By Thames to All the People of the World – Indi Sandhu, Essex Cultural Diversity Project, Essex Cultural Diversity Project Manager
Thurrock Routes is a joint working project between Essex Cultural Diversity Project (ECDP) and Thurrock Museum. The project focuses on the cultural heritage of Thurrock’s communities from 1930 – 2004 and draws on each organisation’s expertise to ensure that Thurrock’s heritage captures and responds to its specific and unique place in UK history and has engages with the diverse communities of Thurrock in bring new audiences to the Museum. This project saw a 15% rise in BME visitors to Thurrock Museum, something which they hope to build on.

Mercury Theatre- Martin Russell, Head of Creative Learning and Talent, Mercury Theatre
Martin spoke about hACkT, the Mercury Theatre’s creative digital offer for young people. hACkT is a summer school that allows young people to create a piece of theatre through a combination of traditional drama activities and technology, video game design and coding. The Mercury Theatre used vlogging to record experiences as opposed to traditional methods of recording, as this ties in with the participants interests and builds their skills. Schools have started hiring in hACKT for term time to meet their STEM requirements.

Breakout Group discussions:
Please note that these are transcriptions from the notes written on the day.
Breakout Group: Getting Started
• Avoid tokenism – do locational work, e.g school or street and don’t compartmentalise or label groups
• Start by mapping/research/listen to what people say. Possibly go where they go, restaurants, cafes, barbers, gyms, etc
• Educate yourself – go out and look and listen
• Be open and flexible – why would people want to come in? Community space/venue or support needed
• Consider throwing away what you do already is you are not attracting a diverse audience
• Juggling with what you already do – keep the good stuff (who decides what is good?)
• How do you change minds of staff?
• Get dates of who visits and build a profile
• Activity suggestions – winter warmer, food and drinks, hot chocolate, mocktails
• Focus groups – maybe not good for the first thing you do but could come later as a tool to plan for next steps
• Choose topics relevant to everyone, e.g. goof and drink, dinosaurs, music and dance, love, games, etc
• Most important thing: build relationships
Breakout Group: How do diversify your recruitment practice?
• Use friendly language that prevents people from understanding the forms/adverts
• Value attitudes rather than qualifications
• Spend more time with applicants – consider group interview days and see how they work in a team
• Include list of what training/benefits the volunteer will receive in return for their time
Breakout Group: Challenges
• Public perceptions of topics, e.g. death
• Capitalising on what you’re known for and expand on it
• Setting the right tone with difficult history/challenging topics
• Using museums as a visual learning space
• Need bigger teams
• Need for advocacy – shout louder about how unhelpful short-term funding is
• Condition of dunging to share outcomes/content more widely
• Curriculum content
Breakout Group: Capturing Feedback- evaluating the intangible
• Twitter – capture and share softer outcomes – Storify/metrics?
• Have conversations rather than feedback forms
• Staff/volunteers can be uncomfortable asking specifically for feedback
• Do we rely too much on paper feedback forms?
• Use SHARE evaluation tool kit
• Requirement for specific information from funders can be difficult
• Work with community members to design evaluation – co-produce methodology
• Ask questions with confidence and interest

WIRE: Wikipedians in Residence Essex

Wikipedians (or Wikimedians) in Residence are volunteers who dedicate time to working in-house at a museum or gallery, creating and updating Wikipedia articles related to that organisation and its collection. They are not simply an in-house editor: the role is also about enabling the host organisation and its members to continue a productive relationship with Wikipedia and its community of editors after the Residency is finished.

Wikipedia describes the idea here
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedian_in_residence

The Fry Gallery, Stow Maries Aerodrome, Essex Police Museum, Combined Military Services Museum and Chelmsford Museum will all be hosting a Wikipedian this autumn as a part of the WIRE project.

WIRE has only just started, and we’ll report back with our learning in a few months. In the meantime, if you’d like to explore updating your museum’s Wikipedia presence (even if you haven’t set one up yourselves, check Wikipedia as a page about your museum probably already exists) you can use the guide below.

Writing for Wikipedia

Be aware that new articles are ‘patrolled’ shortly after submission and if your article is not thought to comply with Wikipedia’s guidelines it will be deleted.

Articles submitted to Wikipedia should be written from a neutral point of view. Content must be
• unbiased
• verifiable
• noteworthy
• must not breach copyright

Think of it as writing an entry for a printed encyclopaedia. Entries should be written in an informational and neutral style rather than a marketing style. If possible facts should be supported by references.

Images should be the copyright of your Museum and be prepared for them to be downloaded and used once you have added them to an article. Consider using a Creative Commons licence to retain copyright while allowing others to use the images. You can find out more about licenses here – https://creativecommons.org/licenses/ Wikipedia expects editors to grant free content licences – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Creative_Commons_license

Before you start do a search on Wikipedia to make sure that someone else hasn’t already written an entry- duplicates will be deleted.

Consider if your article will meet Wikipedia’s ‘worthy of note’ conditions. Just advertising the existence of a museum is unlikely to but adding an article on a collection probably will. Entries should be strengthened by references (preferably online) and an article with no references is likely to be deleted.

There is some good advice here – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Your_first_article

Wikipedia also provides a wizard to help with writing your first article – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Article_wizard

A good tutorial can be found here – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Tutorial

Creating an Account
It is possible to write for and edit Wikipedia without an account but there are several good reasons to create an account for your museum.
• It will give entries more authority
• A number of reliable entries from the same source will build a good online reputation
• You can pick a recognisable user name
• You will have a user page with subpage called a ‘sandbox’ where you can experiment with writing and formatting an entry before submitting it

To Create an Account
https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Special:CreateAccount&returnto=Wikipedia%3AWhy_create_an_account%3F

Logging Your Steps
It’s a good idea to keep a log of your research and make sure you have a note of all the sources you have used along with web links. This makes it easy for you to respond to any queries about your entry and will also leave useful information for the museum should you not be available.

Working with Home Educated Groups at Chelmsford Museum

Yvonne Lawrence, Chelmsford Museum, reflects on her developing work with home educated groups.

There is a large body of parents in Essex who elect to home educate their children. There are many reasons for this, and they are supported by Essex County Council and a range of self-led groups, some of whom organise formal learning sessions with Chelmsford Museums.

With museum education we are used to starting with very little prior information about the participants compared to a school teacher and when working with a group of home educated children this challenge is magnified because the age and ability range is very much larger, typically with participants aged between 4 to 12.  There may be additional special needs including those on the autistic spectrum, with ADHD, dyslexia or with social, behavioural or emotional difficulties.  Often there is a participant in the group who has a special interest in the subject who will be extremely knowledgeable alongside others who know much less.  In an ideal world we would like a full list of participants and any special needs and are working towards this, acknowledging that the situation is much more complex for the visit organiser than for a school.

Chelmsford Museum has been working in partnership with group organisers to ensure that home educated children are able to participate in our history, science and Arts Award sessions at both the main museum and at Sandford Mill. Our first big decision was to limit the group size to a maximum of 17 participants with whole group staying together during the session and led by one tutor.  Given that most participants come with an adult and perhaps a younger sibling or two, this still leads to more people in the room than a standard class and in retrospect we should perhaps have made the limit smaller-perhaps as few as ten participants.  But this would be comparatively expensive for parents/carers as we would still have to cover the tutoring costs and splitting them between fewer people means more cost per person.  Where the visit organiser wanted to book more than one session we explored ways in which younger children could book the morning session whilst older ones came to the afternoon session.  This was reasonably successful.

Home educated children have the luxury of learning at their own pace with a very flexible child-centred learning experience. Unlike a school with set break times and lunch hour, we found that the children seemed to be constantly grazing, eating snacks during the sessions.  The participants and younger siblings would then touch the artefacts, which really wasn’t doing the artefacts any good and posed a hygiene hazard.  We can’t just put our artefacts in a washing up bowl, after all!  So we worked with the group organiser to request that parents were advised of a no-eating rule in the sessions and why this was important, plus reinforcing the need to wash hands after eating.  We provided a trolley outside our education room for food and drinks; and we made a positively-worded request at the start of each session explaining why this was needed and and making it clear people were welcome to step out to eat whenever they wanted to.

To deal with the wide variety of ages, abilities and interests we adapted the format of the sessions to include a very short introduction and overview of what the session entailed with expectations for behaviour – participants and adults! People responded very positively and I think it helped everyone get the most out of the experience.  Typically setting expectations involves explaining the session format and establishing rules such as one person speaking at a time and putting their hand up if they wanted to ask a question during the introduction.  For parents it is worth mentioning active involvement, supervising their children, turning phones to silent and the eating-outside rule.  I always then check if that is OK with the group so we can all get the most out of the learning experience.  Fortunately the answer to that question has always been ‘yes’!

It can be hard to identify which children are taking part in the session so we have tried to set up a separate starter area for participants and parents/siblings. At the museum we often use foam mats on the floor for those taking part during the initial introduction, with parents/siblings seated behind and around them.  Once we establish our participants we start by asking a few questions to establish prior knowledge before introducing tables with a range of different activities linked to the topic.  It works well not to try to regiment the movement of participants as much as a school group, so we normally suggest the participants go off to explore the activities in any order giving an overall time limit to help people plan.  The tables have information cards for the adults with suggested activities, and the only advice we gave was to try to choose tables that weren’t too busy rather than all crowding around the same one.  There are times when we had to accept that a participant was finding it more interesting to sit in the corner playing games on their phone instead of taking part in the session.  They had their reasons, and we take the view that whilst it was our responsibility to provide suitable learning activities it was the participants’ responsibility to engage with them during the session and the supervising adults’ responsibility to intervene (or not) when it came to level of participation.

At the end of each session we come together to discuss what the participants had discovered and answer any questions that arose. Although most of our sessions normally run for two hours, timings are much more fluid with home educator groups and if we do finish a little earlier – or later – that is what we do.  At the end of each session, it is very rewarding to note the number of participants and parents who come up to us to thank us for running the session.  As one mum said to me recently “We appreciate what you are doing.  We know we aren’t the easiest groups to work with because we are all so different so thank you.” And that’s what makes it all worthwhile for us – being able to make that difference!

HELP … with keeping social media running for your museum

The ninth and final in our social media series by Louise Winters.

What can you do if none of the current staff or volunteers has the time or confidence to run a social media account for the museum? At a lot of smaller museums, someone at the museum asks one of their children or a younger friend to help out. Or there may be a few of you who are able to help, but none of you have enough time to do it alone.

As long as it works for the people doing it and the social media reflects the museum positively, in a way staff, volunteers and visitors are happy with that is fine. What you may find more difficult is co-ordinating between you.

Whoever helps out with social media has to have a steady stream of information about the museum, what is happening, who else works there and what kinds of things visitors like to see. If they’re not at the museum regularly they will struggle to write up enough different and interesting posts. If more than one person works on social media then you need a schedule for who is posting what and when.

Talk about it!

All people involved in social media and at least one other person who works at the museum should meet up regularly to talk about ideas for posts and agree them. This is especially important if the person or people looking after social media aren’t staff or don’t do volunteer work there. How else will they know about what is going on for your museum, or what everyone else gets excited about?

Photographs

Once you have ideas for posts, think about what photographs, videos or gifs might be good to illustrate them. You don’t have to decide yet, but if you want to take photographs of an exhibition during set up you’ll need to check with whoever is in charge and plan when you can do it. If you need to ask permission to take and share photographs it is useful to think about it ahead of time.

You can also access photographs that are completely free to use and don’t require the author to be credited (useful for Twitter where you often don’t have room for acknowledgments). Websites like

https://unsplash.com/

https://www.pexels.com/

allow you to search for and use photographs. You can also upload your own photographs and let other people use them for free.

Lastly you can search for animated pictures (or gifs) that are free to use on social media using Giphy (instructions on how to use giphy can be found here: https://giphy.com/faq).

Scheduling & publishing

Once you’ve agreed some ideas and figured out how you can get photographs, note down what you’ve agreed and who is doing what. The two simplest ways to do this are to set up an online calendar or a spreadsheet (something like Google Sheets is free and can be accessed by several people at once) that lists out your ideas for each week and who is responsible.

You will find you have lots of ideas for the next week or so, and then fewer as you get further away from now. Everyone will be able to see when you are running low on ideas. If you have a brilliant idea for Christmas then write it down, even if it’s only May! You’ll also have ideas that are spontaneous and need to be done on that day.

For things you can plan, think about scheduling your posts in advance. Facebook lets you do this directly from its website or mobile app. Twitter doesn’t, but you can use a free tool like Hootsuite to let you schedule your posts for a time in the future.

Review what you’re doing

Once you’ve started, do look at things like your number of fans / followers, the number of people who like your posts, the number of people who retweet or reshare your posts and how many people reply to your posts on social media. You will start to learn which kinds of posts people seem to respond to best and start to see how your hard work is paying off as more people find and follow your social media.

Okay, if you’ve now read all 9 of the blog posts on setting up social media firstly: thank you for reading! Secondly, what are you waiting for? Get ‘social media-ing’ for your museum 😉

http://gph.is/11EoofF

If you have any questions or ideas for things you’d like to read more about on using social media then please share them in the comments below. Also if you have any success stories or anything that worked really well please share those too, it would be great to hear them.

Please do get in touch, I love saying hello:

On Twitter: @pinkyandnobrain

By Email: me@louisewinters.com

On LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/louisewinters/

My website: http://louisewinters.com/