Invitation to join Heritage Watch

 

This guest post is by Stephen Armson-Smith from Essex Police

Heritage Watch was launched in Essex on 23rd April 2015 following the pattern of those already in existence in Cheshire and Hertfordshire. Since that date there have had numerous mini launches around the county membership currently stands at 135 members. We have also assisted Kent and the City of York with the launch of their Heritage Watch schemes.

Heritage Watch is an Essex Police led partnership between agencies that are committed to protecting our heritage, as well as members of the public who want to help preserve our heritage.

The watch scheme looks to maintain and preserve important places of interest, encouraging vigilance and reporting of suspicious activity around sites. This is to prevent any theft or crime that may damage assets beyond recovery, which may lead to the loss of a piece of history for this and future generations.

Heritage Watch locations would include ancient earth works and archaeological sites, listed buildings, museums, galleries, religious buildings, historic visitor attractions buildings and objects of importance to the local community and others.

We aim to inform Heritage Watch members; of crime prevention advice, incidents affecting heritage assets, events and general information relevant to heritage assets both local to Essex and further afield. Naturally no news is good news in relation to crime reports, but we hope also to source other relevant news of interest too. This information will provided by Essex Community Messaging (ECM) and e-mail messages via your local Essex Watch Liaison Officer.

Who can join?

Anyone with a heritage interest including those entrusted with the care or management or ownership of a heritage asset as listed above, or even as an heritage enthusiast or frequent visitor to heritage locations, you can all help each other within Heritage Watch.

For further information and an on-line application form go to:

https://www.essex.police.uk/advice/essex-watch/heritage-watch/

Like other watch schemes we hope that Heritage Watch will be a two way flow of information, with general relevant information and events sent from members via their local Essex Watch Liaison Officer to other members, and members reporting crime and suspicious activity to the Police either by dialing 999 in cases of emergency or crimes in progress or for non-emergencies by dialling 101 or by reporting online.

Training Needs Survey 2018

Object Handling, Packing and Marking

The SHARE Training Needs Survey 2018 is now open.

Every year, SHARE asks museums to help shape their annual training and development programmes. This is your chance to tell SHARE what skills you feel your museum needs to develop and which areas you want support in.

They need as many organisations as possible to complete it, as it helps them know not only what subjects to run, but where in the East of England to put them.

You can complete the survey either on behalf of a museum or as an individual (or both), but they would like as many organisational level responses as possible.

SHARE training is open to staff, volunteers and trustees of museums.

The survey has only 12 very quick and easy questions and takes not more than 10 minutes. It closes on 25th May and can be accessed online here.

If you cannot take part online, please contact me to arrange to receive a Word version.

Snapping the Stiletto Update

Snapping the Stiletto

Logo designed by Essex artist, Lisa Temple-Cox

Pippa Smith is project manager for “Snapping the Stiletto”, an Essex-wide project looking at how women’s lives have changed since gaining the vote in 1918. 

Snapping the Stiletto is a project funded by the Esmée Fairbairn Collections fund which aims to uncover and celebrate stories of strong Essex women over the past 100 years. Working in partnership with 11 museums across (historic) Essex and a range of community groups to steer the project we will be looking for hidden stories of women in museum collections and creating exhibitions and events to share these stories across the county.

CHMPM 536 Pat Foster, 1st female motorcyclist for EP

Pat Foster, first female motorcyclist for Essex Police (copyright Essex Police Museum)

The museums will be recruiting volunteers to help them to research and tell these stories and I’m busy talking to a range of community groups to discover what sort of topics would interest them. So far I’ve had meetings with representatives from the WI and the Shree Ram Mandir  Hindu Cultural and Heritage Centre and spent a very enjoyable couple of hours with the Razed Roof Theatre Company in Harlow . I’ve contacted the Guides, sisters from a local mosque and representatives from a wide range of groups representing the diverse communities across Essex.

History students at Essex University studying a ‘Votes for Women’ module  have been looking at the representation of women in museums and public spaces and tackling some interesting questions set by the project which we hope to blog about soon.

So far two main themes are emerging- groups are interested in the history of women at work, in particular in industry and women as campaigners beyond the suffragettes.

What on earth is GDPR and how does it effect you?

I attended SHARE’s fantastic Data Savvy Fundraising at Ipswich Museum on 18.10.2017, which explored the impact of GDPR legislation. They have another training day coming up on 7.12.2017 at Epping Forest District Museum, click here to find out more and book.

The Association of Independent Museums has published guidance for small museums – click here to access this. In addition to this, I wanted to share a few tips to get you started on thinking about the changes you might need to make before the new legislation comes into force on May 25 2018.

First, the lingo…

Glossary:

GDPR – General Data Protection Regulation, legislation for how we process and store data about people

PECR – Privacy and Electronic Communications Regulations 2003, additional governance for electronic communications including emails, text and mobile phone calls

Data Subject – the person who the data is about

Data Controller – the individual or organisation that is in control of who processes data and why the data is processed (e.g. trustees, museum employees)

Data Processor – the individual or organisations tasked with processing the data on behalf of the Data Controller (this would exclude museum employees but includes volunteers)

Personal Data – defined as “Any information relating to an identified or identifiable natural person.” This means data or combinations of data from which a person (not organisation) can be identified

Sensitive Personal Data – this is personal data, which relates to an individual’s race/ethnicity, religious beliefs, political opinions, mental/physical health, sex life, criminal history and trade union membership

ICO – Information Commissioner’s Officer, the UK’s independent data protection regulator

How will it affect you?

General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) comes into place on May 25 2018 with no transition period. This legislation protects all kinds of personal and sensitive personal data and has been adopted by the UK through the Data Protection Bill so will not be effected by Brexit.

This means that all data you hold about people will have to meet this new standard or be deleted. BUT don’t panic! With a few straightforward steps you will be able to meet this new standard.

What’s it all about?

If you hold data about a person they have the right to know what data you have, access the data, rectify incorrect data, delete all data about themselves, restrict your use of their data, obtain and reuse data and refuse consent to use their data.

The key principles are that data should be:

  1. Accurate and kept up to date
  2. Kept for no longer than is necessary for the purpose it was collected
  3. Processed in a way that ensures appropriate security

The Data Controller (i.e. your museum) is responsible for ensuring that these requirements are met. In order to demonstrate that you are meeting the requirements of GDPR you must:

  1. Implement appropriate measures to ensure you comply with legislation
  2. Keep a record of how you’ve processed data
  3. If appropriate, appoint a person responsible for ensuring compliance (only appropriate for larger organisation)

There are different legal conditions that allow organisations to hold and process personal data but the main two that apply to museums are consent and legitimate interest.

Consent

Consent means that the person has explicitly agreed to you holding their data and using it for specific purposes. Consent has to be used to emails, text messages, mobile phone calls, house phone calls if the person is listed on the Telephone Preference Service and for processing sensitive personal data (see glossary).

Consent must be:

  1. freely given (you can’t offer incentives or force someone)
  2. specific to how you plan to use their data
  3. informed
  4. unambiguous
  5. clear, affirmative action (i.e. you can’t use ‘opt out’ options)
  6. demonstrable (you must be able to prove that the person gave their consent if asked)

Consent doesn’t necessarily last for forever and should be refreshed at appropriate intervals. The GDPR doesn’t give an exact time frame, but every 24 months is recommended. Consent expires when the purpose for which you collected the data ends. For example if you hold someone’s details because they’re a volunteer, when they stop volunteering you must delete the data, unless you request permission to keep the data for another reason.

Example consent form:Example consent

(From ‘A practical guide to lawful fundraising for arts and cultural organisations’, June 2017, by BWB and ACE. Click here to access the full document.)

Data you have previously collected must meet this new standard. If it does not, you can ask for consent or you must delete this data. There is no such thing as implied consent.

Legitimate Interest

Please note that any local authority or university museums cannot use Legitimate Interest as a reason for holding personal data. This is explicitly banned in the GDPR.

Organisations that are not managed by a local authority or university can use Legitimate Interest to justify handling data without consent when the data processing is ‘necessary’ for the legitimate interest of the data controller (i.e. the museum). Your organisation has a necessary legitimate interest when using the data achieves an organisational objective (this is vague and will probably be tested in court).

Before you use Legitimate Interest you must ask yourself:

  1. Why this activity is important?
  2. Is processing the data is the only way of achieving your ‘necessary’ objective?
  3. If processing the data isn’t the only way to achieve the objective, why do you believe that handling the data is the most appropriate approach?

Whether or not you can use Legitimate Interest depends on the ‘reasonable expectation’ of the individual when they gave you the data. You must consider:

  1. What is the direct impact on the individual?
  2. Are the consequences for the individual positive?
  3. Is there a link between the original purpose that the data was given and how you want to use the data?
  4. What kind of data is being processed?
  5. Could your use of the data be considered obtrusive?

For example, if someone agreed to give you their address when they donated an object they might expect that you would contact them to ask a question about the object but they might not expect you to post them leaflets about all your museum events.

People can opt out of allowing you to use their data for legitimate interest.

You cannot use Legitimate Interest to contact people via email, text message or mobile phone call as this is governed by the PECR legislation. You can use Legitimate Interest to contact people by post or home phone call (provided their number isn’t listed on the Telephone Preference Service).

Privacy Policies

If you haven’t told someone how you’re going to use their data, you probably can’t use it. Your privacy policy sets out how you will use their data. A privacy policy should include:

  1. Who you are (identity and contact details of Data Controller)
  2. Why you want their data
  3. The legal basis for processing the data
  4. Who the data will be shared with
  5. How long the data will be held
  6. The person’s rights
  7. The right to withdraw consent
  8. The right to complain to the ICO
  9. The source of the data (if it’s not being provided by the person)
  10. Any automised data handling (for example wealth screening for fundraising purposes)

This is a lot of information for a person to take in! You might give this information at the point of consent being given, and it could be a link from your consent form (if you’re doing it online). This would look something like this:

privacy statement

(From ‘A practical guide to lawful fundraising for arts and cultural organisations’, June 2017, by BWB and ACE. Click here to access the full document.)

You can see examples of good and bad privacy policies if you click here.

What do you need to do?

  1. Don’t ignore it!
  2. Don’t work alone – make sure your whole team is on board
  3. Do audit your use of data
  4. Do write or review your privacy policy
  5. Do keep a record of your decisions

Need more information?

https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/data-protection-reform/overview-of-the-gdpr/

https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/guide-to-data-protection/privacy-notices-transparency-and-control/privacy-notices-in-practice/

http://www.artscouncil.org.uk/sites/default/files/download-file/A%20Practical%20Guide%20to%20Lawful%20Fundraising.pdf – practical examples of consent and privacy policies

https://2040infolawblog.com/

HELP … with keeping social media running for your museum

The ninth and final in our social media series by Louise Winters.

What can you do if none of the current staff or volunteers has the time or confidence to run a social media account for the museum? At a lot of smaller museums, someone at the museum asks one of their children or a younger friend to help out. Or there may be a few of you who are able to help, but none of you have enough time to do it alone.

As long as it works for the people doing it and the social media reflects the museum positively, in a way staff, volunteers and visitors are happy with that is fine. What you may find more difficult is co-ordinating between you.

Whoever helps out with social media has to have a steady stream of information about the museum, what is happening, who else works there and what kinds of things visitors like to see. If they’re not at the museum regularly they will struggle to write up enough different and interesting posts. If more than one person works on social media then you need a schedule for who is posting what and when.

Talk about it!

All people involved in social media and at least one other person who works at the museum should meet up regularly to talk about ideas for posts and agree them. This is especially important if the person or people looking after social media aren’t staff or don’t do volunteer work there. How else will they know about what is going on for your museum, or what everyone else gets excited about?

Photographs

Once you have ideas for posts, think about what photographs, videos or gifs might be good to illustrate them. You don’t have to decide yet, but if you want to take photographs of an exhibition during set up you’ll need to check with whoever is in charge and plan when you can do it. If you need to ask permission to take and share photographs it is useful to think about it ahead of time.

You can also access photographs that are completely free to use and don’t require the author to be credited (useful for Twitter where you often don’t have room for acknowledgments). Websites like

https://unsplash.com/

https://www.pexels.com/

allow you to search for and use photographs. You can also upload your own photographs and let other people use them for free.

Lastly you can search for animated pictures (or gifs) that are free to use on social media using Giphy (instructions on how to use giphy can be found here: https://giphy.com/faq).

Scheduling & publishing

Once you’ve agreed some ideas and figured out how you can get photographs, note down what you’ve agreed and who is doing what. The two simplest ways to do this are to set up an online calendar or a spreadsheet (something like Google Sheets is free and can be accessed by several people at once) that lists out your ideas for each week and who is responsible.

You will find you have lots of ideas for the next week or so, and then fewer as you get further away from now. Everyone will be able to see when you are running low on ideas. If you have a brilliant idea for Christmas then write it down, even if it’s only May! You’ll also have ideas that are spontaneous and need to be done on that day.

For things you can plan, think about scheduling your posts in advance. Facebook lets you do this directly from its website or mobile app. Twitter doesn’t, but you can use a free tool like Hootsuite to let you schedule your posts for a time in the future.

Review what you’re doing

Once you’ve started, do look at things like your number of fans / followers, the number of people who like your posts, the number of people who retweet or reshare your posts and how many people reply to your posts on social media. You will start to learn which kinds of posts people seem to respond to best and start to see how your hard work is paying off as more people find and follow your social media.

Okay, if you’ve now read all 9 of the blog posts on setting up social media firstly: thank you for reading! Secondly, what are you waiting for? Get ‘social media-ing’ for your museum 😉

http://gph.is/11EoofF

If you have any questions or ideas for things you’d like to read more about on using social media then please share them in the comments below. Also if you have any success stories or anything that worked really well please share those too, it would be great to hear them.

Please do get in touch, I love saying hello:

On Twitter: @pinkyandnobrain

By Email: me@louisewinters.com

On LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/louisewinters/

My website: http://louisewinters.com/

Events and Activities at your Museum

The eighth in our social media series by Louise Winters.

We have fun stuff happening at our museum!

You’re probably already thinking about using social media to tell people about events at your museum. It’s an obvious topic and social media is perfect for it.

If you’ve already tried it, you may have found that you post one or two messages about an event and no-one seems to take any notice. A really useful tip is to remember you can (and should!) make several posts about the same event or activity over the course of a few days or even a few weeks.

One post isn’t visible for long as other people are posting on social media all the time, so repeating the message is important. Also, people often need to see or hear the same thing a few times before they can take on board new information. It’s fine to tell people several times! You can vary the message slightly by rephrasing or using a different photograph, but keep the core message the same.

How to write posts on events & activities:

  1. Basic event details

People want to know when, where and how to get involved. A great way to share this is to share a digital version of event posters or create your own digital poster. Attach this poster to every tweet, Facebook post and blog post and then there’s not excise for people to be confused about the basic information. Also write out the basic information in some of your posts to make sure it can’t be missed.

Ever head of Museum Dance Off? Not strictly an event designed for visitors to join in, but it does create many possibilities for silliness on social media 😉 Brooklands Museum in Surrey created an excellent poster to encourage followers to vote for them:

  1. Convey WHY people want to join in

Basic information is good, but I’ll easily ignore it or forget about it if I don’t know WHY I want to join in. Go back to the list you made in our first post in this series: what kind of people visit or could visit your museum? What kinds of people is this activity for and what will they get from joining in?

The Museum Explorer Passport trail is a good example of an activity to use:

Kinds of people What they get from joining in
Parents 1.       Ideas for activities to keep the kids entertained
  2.       A bit of peace while the kids explore the museum
Young children 3.       See and explore cool stuff in the museum
  4.       Enjoy a game of collecting stickers or stamps in their museum passport
Older children 5.       Competition element with friends (who can get the most stamps?)
   

Your social media posts can tell different types of people what they’ll enjoy. Each point on your list is an idea for one social media post, so in the list about there are already 5 different subjects for posts. Of course you can explain each point in different ways so you will already have a long list of posts for your social media, all about just one activity going on at the museum.

Going back to Brooklands Museum, they created posts about their Museum Dance Off entry over several weeks and they made it clear why people would want to get involved: to laugh at their daft video and help them win the competition.

Encourage interaction with visitors on social media

Specific events or activities are a great opportunity to ask visitors to interact with you on social media. If photography is allowed in your museum let visitors know at the event that you’d be very happy if they take a selfie, post it and tag your museum so you can find it later. Have you heard of #museumselfie on Twitter? The official Museum Selfie Day is on January 18th, but you can use it or ask visitors to use it any time!

And your staff and volunteers can get involved … https://twitter.com/NatGalleryCan/status/821822649072578560

Other ways you can encourage people to interact are to ask questions: both on social media and to people at the museum for the event. If you’re asking people in person, check they are happy for you to share what they say on social media and make it into a post.

Ideas for questions:

  • What are you looking forward to at the event? (before it happens)
  • Do you know anyone who’d love this? Please share with them!
  • What did you like best about the event? (after it happens)

Have you come up with any interesting ways to encourage visitors to interact with you on social media? Please share in the comments below if you have.

Please do get in touch, I love saying hello:

On Twitter: @pinkyandnobrain

By Email: me@louisewinters.com

On LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/louisewinters/

My website: http://louisewinters.com/

 

Involve Museum staff and volunteers in social media

The seventh in our social media series from Louise Winters.

When you’re looking for ideas for your museum’s social media, people who already love your museum are a brilliant source of inspiration.

Your museum’s staff and volunteers are the easiest place to start. They love the museum and they know it well. The people that help to run the museum make it what it is as much as the collections and objects. You may even get them to share any posts you write about them to their own Facebook or Twitter networks so they’re seen by a bigger audience. Even if they don’t use social media they’ll probably enjoy getting involved.

How can I involve them?

Here are some simple ideas for social media posts about the fantastic people that help to run your museum (and yes, that includes you!)

  • Photographs of staff and volunteers at work in the museum.
  • Say thank you! Post a big thank you to volunteers for their work at an event or on a specific project or even just on a busy bank holiday.
  • Ask about a colleague’s favourite object and why they like it and use this for a post with their name and a photo of them with the object (check with them they are okay with this before you do it).
  • Post a happy birthday message for a colleague on their birthday (do ask their permission first).
  • Ask a colleague how they got involved in the museum and share their story in a blog a condensed version for social media.
  • Ask colleagues about their favourite other museums to visit and write up into a short post, don’t forget to tag the museum on social media if they use it.

Some examples to show you how other museums are doing this:

 

 

 

 

 

All posts you create that are inspired by a specific colleague should include the name of the person you are talking about and tag them on the relevant social media network, if they use it. The general public like to get to know who works at the museum and find out more about them. Human beings are nosey and like knowing a bit about the real people that work in a place.

Have you ever looked at social media for the National Trust for Scotland? They’ve even set up a Twitter account to talk about volunteering and encourage volunteers to share photos of the things they enjoy doing.

 

Social media is a really good way to make sure everyone knows how important your volunteers are, and showing appreciation for your museum staff is equally important.

I’ve asked if colleagues want to get involved and not had a good response

It’s useful to remember that your colleagues often won’t realise that their own interests and stories are interesting. Their enthusiasm for the museum and working there is infectious – if you can show that they care about the museum then others who see that will care too. Be patient and keep showing colleagues what you’d like from them. That may be to share photographs they take with you or it may be to have a chat for 10 minutes about their favourite object.

Your mission is to find out what makes them light up and find a way to share that with all those potential visitors. Think about which kinds of people will find your colleague’s story interesting and aim your post at those people. Ask your colleague to share with their family and friends on social media and see what kind of response you get.

Last piece of advice: try not to be disheartened if your posts don’t immediately get a huge response. Your social media efforts will gradually build up likes and responses as you keep posting regularly. Reassure your colleagues that their help is really important for creating interesting posts.

Please do get in touch, I love saying hello:

On Twitter: @pinkyandnobrain

By Email: me@louisewinters.com

On LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/louisewinters/

My website: http://louisewinters.com/