SHARE Creative Communities Network

CIMS 100 United

Does your museum want to work more closely with local communities? Do you want to bring in new visitors, improve your reach and build relationships? Diversifying audiences and giving ownership to local communities are both priorities for HLF and Arts Council and this network is a way to bounce around ideas with colleagues, learn from each other and hear about funding and other opportunities. We will meet quarterly through the year and help shape the SHARE programme around community participation.

Our first meeting will be in September at Ipswich Museum. We will be focusing on the new OFBYFOR ALL self-assessment tool and we would ask that attendees’ museums have completed the assessment ahead of the meeting, preferably as a team rather than an individual on their own and ideally including some of your community partners in the process.

In addition to join the network mailing list, please email amy.cotterill@essex.gov.uk. Additionally, please can you let us have your availability for September by completing this poll   

– Amy Cotterill (Essex MDO) and Eleanor Root (Colchester and Ipswich Museums)

Benchmarking Survey – Have You Completed It Yet?

chart close up data desk

Photo by Lukas on Pexels.com

Now in its 16th year, SHARE’s annual benchmarking survey is aimed at museums in the region who are Accredited or currently Working Towards Accreditation (or with ambitions to be so).

The information SHARE receives from your surveys helps them, me as the county lead for museums and you to demonstrate the social and economic impact and importance of museums and heritage sites both locally and regionally to funders and stakeholders, helping to sustain investment in our sector.

Your survey returns are hugely important, not only to support us in our advocacy but so SHARE can get a clear picture of your annual activities and support you better as your regional museum development provider.

 

From the 2016/17 survey we know that:

  • there were more than 3,606,169 million visits to museums in the East of England region
  • visits to museums contributed over £60 million to the regional economy
  • there were more than 229,341 participants in learning activities provided by museums
  • and 6,608 museum volunteers who contributed an incredible 812,366 hours to museums
  • meaning that volunteer time was worth £5.8 million to museums
  • museums also employed 915 paid staff

In tough economic times for museums every little helps, and your stats can help enormously!

The survey is short and will be easy to complete by a volunteer or member of staff with a good overview of their museum’s work. The questions cover visitor numbers and engagement; museum finances; volunteers and staff; educational work as well as challenges and opportunities for the future. The data that you provide should be for the period 1st April 2017 – 31st March 2018.

 

If you are a multi-site, or a museum that hosts another Accredited collection within your museum, please contact museum.development@bristol.gov.uk for a bespoke survey form.

 

You can complete the survey online here. If you are unable to complete it all in one go then you can save and return to your answers at any time. Alternatively you can also complete  this paper version and return it via email or post to me as your MDO.  The deadline for completing the survey is Friday 31st August 2018.

 

A partial return is better than no return! If you can’t answer all of the questions because you haven’t been collecting the data, please do what you can.

 

If you have any questions about completing the survey then you can get in touch with museum.development@bristol.gov.uk

#OFBYFORALL: A Revolutionary Opportunity

Nina Simon and Amy Cotterill

Nina Simon from the Santa Cruz Museum of Art and History with Amy Cotterill, Essex MDO 

A few weeks ago I attended the Museum Next conference in London. It was an exciting three days and I learned a lot, but one of the most inspirational presentations was by Nina Simon of the Santa Cruz Museum of Art and History (MAH).

 

If you have time, I urge you to watch the video below. Nina speaks eloquently about how stronger community engagement saved the museum. Partnership working, co-creating programming and changing their recruitment processes have turned them around. In 2011 they had a budget of $700 000, in 2018 it’s $3 000 000. They have gone from 7 members of staff to 32 and17 000 visitors per year to 140 000.

Nina and MAH’s work has been so exceptional, they have raised $900 000 to roll out an international programme of support called OFBYFOR ALL to help more museums around the world work in this way.

 

The first step, one which all heritage organisations can do, is to complete their free self-assessment tool. It will give you an organisational score as to how “of, by and for” your local communities your museum is and highlight your strengths and weaknesses. This could be a good exercise to do as a team, working together to identify ways of improving. If possible, it would be good to include representatives of your community partners in the process as your perceptions and theirs might be different.

 

The second step is to apply to be part of their “first wave” research program, helping to test and co-develop tools which will help your organisation and others become more OFBYFOR. They are looking for organisations that are from diverse sizes, sectors, and geographies that are ready to make change in the next six months.

 

If accepted for the programme, your museum will have:

  • Free access to OFBYFOR ALL online platform and tools for 1 year
  • Personalized support in developing a plan and tracking your progress
  • Global support and community-building with other First Wave colleagues
  • Promotion and PR about your founding involvement in the project
  • Opportunity to be part of the beginning of something big

The OFBYFOR ALL Change Network will eventually become a paid-model, but this First Wave is free as you will be helping to develop and test the model and resources. The only exception is covering travel expenses to attend an in-person event in January (and you may be able to access Museum Development help to support this – contact me if you would like to apply). There will also be the opportunity to attend an OFBYFOR ALL Bootcamp, which you would also have to pay for.

For more information about the programme, the self-assessment tool and the opportunity to take part in the first wave of the change network, visit the OFBYFOR ALL website.

 

Invitation to join Heritage Watch

 

This guest post is by Stephen Armson-Smith from Essex Police

Heritage Watch was launched in Essex on 23rd April 2015 following the pattern of those already in existence in Cheshire and Hertfordshire. Since that date there have had numerous mini launches around the county membership currently stands at 135 members. We have also assisted Kent and the City of York with the launch of their Heritage Watch schemes.

Heritage Watch is an Essex Police led partnership between agencies that are committed to protecting our heritage, as well as members of the public who want to help preserve our heritage.

The watch scheme looks to maintain and preserve important places of interest, encouraging vigilance and reporting of suspicious activity around sites. This is to prevent any theft or crime that may damage assets beyond recovery, which may lead to the loss of a piece of history for this and future generations.

Heritage Watch locations would include ancient earth works and archaeological sites, listed buildings, museums, galleries, religious buildings, historic visitor attractions buildings and objects of importance to the local community and others.

We aim to inform Heritage Watch members; of crime prevention advice, incidents affecting heritage assets, events and general information relevant to heritage assets both local to Essex and further afield. Naturally no news is good news in relation to crime reports, but we hope also to source other relevant news of interest too. This information will provided by Essex Community Messaging (ECM) and e-mail messages via your local Essex Watch Liaison Officer.

Who can join?

Anyone with a heritage interest including those entrusted with the care or management or ownership of a heritage asset as listed above, or even as an heritage enthusiast or frequent visitor to heritage locations, you can all help each other within Heritage Watch.

For further information and an on-line application form go to:

https://www.essex.police.uk/advice/essex-watch/heritage-watch/

Like other watch schemes we hope that Heritage Watch will be a two way flow of information, with general relevant information and events sent from members via their local Essex Watch Liaison Officer to other members, and members reporting crime and suspicious activity to the Police either by dialing 999 in cases of emergency or crimes in progress or for non-emergencies by dialling 101 or by reporting online.

Training Needs Survey 2018

Object Handling, Packing and Marking

The SHARE Training Needs Survey 2018 is now open.

Every year, SHARE asks museums to help shape their annual training and development programmes. This is your chance to tell SHARE what skills you feel your museum needs to develop and which areas you want support in.

They need as many organisations as possible to complete it, as it helps them know not only what subjects to run, but where in the East of England to put them.

You can complete the survey either on behalf of a museum or as an individual (or both), but they would like as many organisational level responses as possible.

SHARE training is open to staff, volunteers and trustees of museums.

The survey has only 12 very quick and easy questions and takes not more than 10 minutes. It closes on 25th May and can be accessed online here.

If you cannot take part online, please contact me to arrange to receive a Word version.

Snapping the Stiletto Update

Snapping the Stiletto

Logo designed by Essex artist, Lisa Temple-Cox

Pippa Smith is project manager for “Snapping the Stiletto”, an Essex-wide project looking at how women’s lives have changed since gaining the vote in 1918. 

Snapping the Stiletto is a project funded by the Esmée Fairbairn Collections fund which aims to uncover and celebrate stories of strong Essex women over the past 100 years. Working in partnership with 11 museums across (historic) Essex and a range of community groups to steer the project we will be looking for hidden stories of women in museum collections and creating exhibitions and events to share these stories across the county.

CHMPM 536 Pat Foster, 1st female motorcyclist for EP

Pat Foster, first female motorcyclist for Essex Police (copyright Essex Police Museum)

The museums will be recruiting volunteers to help them to research and tell these stories and I’m busy talking to a range of community groups to discover what sort of topics would interest them. So far I’ve had meetings with representatives from the WI and the Shree Ram Mandir  Hindu Cultural and Heritage Centre and spent a very enjoyable couple of hours with the Razed Roof Theatre Company in Harlow . I’ve contacted the Guides, sisters from a local mosque and representatives from a wide range of groups representing the diverse communities across Essex.

History students at Essex University studying a ‘Votes for Women’ module  have been looking at the representation of women in museums and public spaces and tackling some interesting questions set by the project which we hope to blog about soon.

So far two main themes are emerging- groups are interested in the history of women at work, in particular in industry and women as campaigners beyond the suffragettes.

What on earth is GDPR and how does it effect you?

I attended SHARE’s fantastic Data Savvy Fundraising at Ipswich Museum on 18.10.2017, which explored the impact of GDPR legislation. They have another training day coming up on 7.12.2017 at Epping Forest District Museum, click here to find out more and book.

The Association of Independent Museums has published guidance for small museums – click here to access this. In addition to this, I wanted to share a few tips to get you started on thinking about the changes you might need to make before the new legislation comes into force on May 25 2018.

First, the lingo…

Glossary:

GDPR – General Data Protection Regulation, legislation for how we process and store data about people

PECR – Privacy and Electronic Communications Regulations 2003, additional governance for electronic communications including emails, text and mobile phone calls

Data Subject – the person who the data is about

Data Controller – the individual or organisation that is in control of who processes data and why the data is processed (e.g. trustees, museum employees)

Data Processor – the individual or organisations tasked with processing the data on behalf of the Data Controller (this would exclude museum employees but includes volunteers)

Personal Data – defined as “Any information relating to an identified or identifiable natural person.” This means data or combinations of data from which a person (not organisation) can be identified

Sensitive Personal Data – this is personal data, which relates to an individual’s race/ethnicity, religious beliefs, political opinions, mental/physical health, sex life, criminal history and trade union membership

ICO – Information Commissioner’s Officer, the UK’s independent data protection regulator

How will it affect you?

General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) comes into place on May 25 2018 with no transition period. This legislation protects all kinds of personal and sensitive personal data and has been adopted by the UK through the Data Protection Bill so will not be effected by Brexit.

This means that all data you hold about people will have to meet this new standard or be deleted. BUT don’t panic! With a few straightforward steps you will be able to meet this new standard.

What’s it all about?

If you hold data about a person they have the right to know what data you have, access the data, rectify incorrect data, delete all data about themselves, restrict your use of their data, obtain and reuse data and refuse consent to use their data.

The key principles are that data should be:

  1. Accurate and kept up to date
  2. Kept for no longer than is necessary for the purpose it was collected
  3. Processed in a way that ensures appropriate security

The Data Controller (i.e. your museum) is responsible for ensuring that these requirements are met. In order to demonstrate that you are meeting the requirements of GDPR you must:

  1. Implement appropriate measures to ensure you comply with legislation
  2. Keep a record of how you’ve processed data
  3. If appropriate, appoint a person responsible for ensuring compliance (only appropriate for larger organisation)

There are different legal conditions that allow organisations to hold and process personal data but the main two that apply to museums are consent and legitimate interest.

Consent

Consent means that the person has explicitly agreed to you holding their data and using it for specific purposes. Consent has to be used to emails, text messages, mobile phone calls, house phone calls if the person is listed on the Telephone Preference Service and for processing sensitive personal data (see glossary).

Consent must be:

  1. freely given (you can’t offer incentives or force someone)
  2. specific to how you plan to use their data
  3. informed
  4. unambiguous
  5. clear, affirmative action (i.e. you can’t use ‘opt out’ options)
  6. demonstrable (you must be able to prove that the person gave their consent if asked)

Consent doesn’t necessarily last for forever and should be refreshed at appropriate intervals. The GDPR doesn’t give an exact time frame, but every 24 months is recommended. Consent expires when the purpose for which you collected the data ends. For example if you hold someone’s details because they’re a volunteer, when they stop volunteering you must delete the data, unless you request permission to keep the data for another reason.

Example consent form:Example consent

(From ‘A practical guide to lawful fundraising for arts and cultural organisations’, June 2017, by BWB and ACE. Click here to access the full document.)

Data you have previously collected must meet this new standard. If it does not, you can ask for consent or you must delete this data. There is no such thing as implied consent.

Legitimate Interest

Please note that any local authority or university museums cannot use Legitimate Interest as a reason for holding personal data. This is explicitly banned in the GDPR.

Organisations that are not managed by a local authority or university can use Legitimate Interest to justify handling data without consent when the data processing is ‘necessary’ for the legitimate interest of the data controller (i.e. the museum). Your organisation has a necessary legitimate interest when using the data achieves an organisational objective (this is vague and will probably be tested in court).

Before you use Legitimate Interest you must ask yourself:

  1. Why this activity is important?
  2. Is processing the data is the only way of achieving your ‘necessary’ objective?
  3. If processing the data isn’t the only way to achieve the objective, why do you believe that handling the data is the most appropriate approach?

Whether or not you can use Legitimate Interest depends on the ‘reasonable expectation’ of the individual when they gave you the data. You must consider:

  1. What is the direct impact on the individual?
  2. Are the consequences for the individual positive?
  3. Is there a link between the original purpose that the data was given and how you want to use the data?
  4. What kind of data is being processed?
  5. Could your use of the data be considered obtrusive?

For example, if someone agreed to give you their address when they donated an object they might expect that you would contact them to ask a question about the object but they might not expect you to post them leaflets about all your museum events.

People can opt out of allowing you to use their data for legitimate interest.

You cannot use Legitimate Interest to contact people via email, text message or mobile phone call as this is governed by the PECR legislation. You can use Legitimate Interest to contact people by post or home phone call (provided their number isn’t listed on the Telephone Preference Service).

Privacy Policies

If you haven’t told someone how you’re going to use their data, you probably can’t use it. Your privacy policy sets out how you will use their data. A privacy policy should include:

  1. Who you are (identity and contact details of Data Controller)
  2. Why you want their data
  3. The legal basis for processing the data
  4. Who the data will be shared with
  5. How long the data will be held
  6. The person’s rights
  7. The right to withdraw consent
  8. The right to complain to the ICO
  9. The source of the data (if it’s not being provided by the person)
  10. Any automised data handling (for example wealth screening for fundraising purposes)

This is a lot of information for a person to take in! You might give this information at the point of consent being given, and it could be a link from your consent form (if you’re doing it online). This would look something like this:

privacy statement

(From ‘A practical guide to lawful fundraising for arts and cultural organisations’, June 2017, by BWB and ACE. Click here to access the full document.)

You can see examples of good and bad privacy policies if you click here.

What do you need to do?

  1. Don’t ignore it!
  2. Don’t work alone – make sure your whole team is on board
  3. Do audit your use of data
  4. Do write or review your privacy policy
  5. Do keep a record of your decisions

Need more information?

https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/data-protection-reform/overview-of-the-gdpr/

https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/guide-to-data-protection/privacy-notices-transparency-and-control/privacy-notices-in-practice/

http://www.artscouncil.org.uk/sites/default/files/download-file/A%20Practical%20Guide%20to%20Lawful%20Fundraising.pdf – practical examples of consent and privacy policies

https://2040infolawblog.com/