Learning & Engagement Grants For Essex Museums

colchester-alison-stockmarr

Essex Museum Development is offering grants of up to £500 to support the delivery of learning and community engagement using collections.

The grants aim to support local museums to:

  1. Develop relationships with local education providers including schools, colleges and home education groups
  2. Develop new learning and engagement resources
  3. Develop an adult learning offer
  4. Deliver activities which will reach new audiences
  5. Make their venue more accessible for disabled audiences

The funding scheme is open to any Accredited museum (or museum registered as Working Towards Accreditation) within the Essex or Southend-on-Sea local authority boundaries. Please note that to apply you must have attended at least two of the following training days:

It is important to read the guidance document before applying. It contains some suggestions as to what the grant can be used for, but this is not an exhaustive list. Please do get in contact if you wish to discuss your ideas.

To apply, complete this application form and return it to amy.cotterill@essex.gov.uk by 5pm on Tuesday 23rd January 2018

Learning and Engagement application guidance 2018

Click here to download the application form

 

Learning & Engagement Grants For Essex Museums

colchester-alison-stockmarr

Essex Museum Development is offering grants of up to £500 to support the delivery of learning and community engagement using collections.

 

The grants aim to support local museums to:

  1. Develop relationships with local education providers including schools, colleges and home education groups
  2. Develop new learning and engagement resources
  3. Develop an adult learning offer
  4. Deliver activities which will reach new audiences
  5. Make their venue more accessible for disabled audiences

 

The funding scheme is open to any Accredited museum (or museum registered as Working Towards Accreditation) within the Essex or Southend-on-Sea local authority boundaries.

 

It is important to read the guidance document before applying. It contains some suggestions as to what the grant can be used for, but this is not an exhaustive list. Please do get in contact if you wish to discuss your ideas.

 

To apply, complete this application form and return it to amy.cotterill@essex.gov.uk by 5pm on Tuesday 28th February 2017

Guidance Document: learning-and-engagement-application-guidance-2017

Application Form: learning-and-engagement-application-form-2017

 

Sign-Up For Summer: Museum Explorer Passport 2016

Museum Explorer

In 2015, a pilot project ran across Bedfordshire, Essex and Hertfordshire. The evaluation of the pilot project has led to some revisions of the original project, which is being run for a second year and expanded to be open to more museums, and to run for a longer period of time. The project has also been simplified and will be accompanied by more direct marketing to provide additional support to participating museums.

 

The project is open to all museums across Hertfordshire, Essex and Bedfordshire who will be offering activities for children during the 2016 May half term and / or summer holidays. There is a fee of £50 to participate in the 2016 project, which will go towards supporting the cost of the project.

Children will be given a Passport and a series (approx. 6) of simple challenges to complete during the summer holidays; e.g. ‘visit a museum you have not been to before’ ‘take part in a workshop involving clay’ Challenges will be open enough to allow children to have a good choice of museums to visit in order to achieve all of them. Each museum listing in the passport with have a blank space where museums will be able to ‘stamp’ the passports when children visit them. There will also be a blank space next to the challenges that can be stamped.

Museums will be provided with everything they need to participate: blank passports, stamps, stickers, flyers and posters, press release template, briefing note (to be shared will all staff and volunteers), and other supporting information. Alongside this will be a programme of marketing via a project specific website, linked to all partner museum websites. Social media will be utilised and museums will be supported to develop their skills in this area. In 2016 we will also advertising in relevant local publications.
Cost
To help support the project, we are asking museums to contribute £50 per site towards the costs. In the 2015 pilot museums received £177 worth of resources and support per site, so this is a good return on your investment!

We can also invoice you in either March or April, depending on which financial year’s budget you would like to use.
Project timetable

  1. Recruit museums to the project

    The deadline for applications is Friday 11th December 2015

     

  2. Website copy

    There are two deadlines for providing information to be included on the website:

    For events in May and June: Friday 22nd April 2016

    For events in July and August: Wednesday 8th June 2016

     

  3. Launch event

    Essex: Monday 25th April

    Herts and Beds: Wednesday 4th May 2016

     

  4. Project goes live!

    The project will be fully live from Saturday 28th May 2016

     

  5. Ongoing promotion

    Via website, social media, listings publications and websites, and museums’ own distribution lists. Each museum will be given a supply of branded stickers for participating children. Events across the May half term holiday and entire summer holidays will be promoted.

  6. Evaluation

    The project will be evaluated by the steering group, which has been expanded from the pilot project to include representation from museums directly. This will take place in September 2016, participating museums will be asked to fill in a short questionnaire and collect minimal data through noting down any anecdotal feedback from your visitors during the project.

To apply, complete this form and email it to me by Friday 11th December.

Be A “Mega Star” With CREST Awards

CREST Award LogoThanks for the great work of the Royal Opera House Bridge we are very familiar with the Arts Award scheme here in Essex. But did you know there is also a scheme which provides qualifications for young people learning in science subjects too?

Last week I talked about the British Science Association’s Science Week. Today, I’m following up by introducing their CREST Scheme.

CREST Star is their scheme for children aged 5 to 12. It has 3 levels:

  • Star for 5 to 7 year olds
  • Super Star for 7 to 11 year olds
  • Mega Star for 8 to 12 year olds

Children participating in Star take part in a series of 1 hour activities. For every activity they complete, they get a sticker to put in their log book (which can be downloaded for free from the website). Once the log book is full they get their certificate.

While the British Science Association have created many activities themselves it is possible to become a CREST partner and have science activities accredited by the scheme. It is possible that sessions you already offer schools, youth groups etc  could be accredited in this way.

The CREST Awards are the BSA’s offer for young people aged over 11. There are four levels of award. The first level is Discovery. This bridges the gap between CREST Star and CREST Awards. It can be delivered in 5 hours and is envisioned as “CREST in a day”. This other three levels are based on projects undertaken by the participants:

  • Bronze – 10 hours of activity
  • Silver – 30 hours
  • Gold – 70 hours

Project ideas can come from the young people, teachers/youth leaders or organisations like ours. However, the decision should be student-led, so that they choose a topic they are interested in.

Once the participants have completed their project, their work is assessed and (if successful) they will receive a personalised certificate.

CREST Awards are endorsed by UCAS (the body that oversees applications to universities) and also count towards Duke of Edinburgh Awards and the Children’s University Passport to Learning. As they are an accredited qualification, there is a small per-pupil fee involved to cover assessment costs, details of which can be found here.

As mentioned in my last post, the definition of science is a broad one. Activities could be in many areas that your museum covers such as natural history, archaeology, medicine, forensics, engineering, technology and social sciences.

Many museums are moving away from history and towards science in their offer to schools. This may be a good way of accrediting your offer and making it more attractive to teachers.

Have a think about what you’re already offering it could be but you already have activities that could be parts of the CREST scheme visit the British Science Association website and investigate further.

Funding For British Science Week

On Wednesday, the British Science Association gave a presentation at the SHARE Regional Learning Network which I thought might be of interest which I thought would be of interest to many of you…

What Is The British Science Association?
British Science AssociationThe BSA, previously known as British Association for the Advancement of Science, was founded in 1831.

Like history and the arts, science has a “professional class” – people who do it for a living. However far few people see science as something you can has as a hobby or take-part in informally.  The BSA’s goal is to change this by engaging the wider public with science through events, activities and projects. The best known of these is the annual British Science Festival, which takes place in a different city each tear and dates back to 1831. However, they also offer CREST Awards for young people (which I will be writing about in another post next week), and British Science Week.

Why Is This Relevant To Museums?

The definition of “science” used by the BSA is a very broad one. It includes natural history, medicine, archaeology, forensics, engineering… in fact most museums will have something in their collection which is applicable. The BSA offer grants of up to £500 for community organisations, including museums (even local authority ones!) to run events during British Science Week that are targeted at an audience which is traditionally under-represented in science.

How Can Museums Get Involved?

The 2016 British Science Week will take place between the 11th and 20th of March. The audiences they particularly want to reach out to through their Community Grant Scheme are:

  • Black and Minority Ethnic Groups
  • Those of a low socioeconomic status
  • Young people with anti-social behaviour including those who are not in education employment or training (NEET)
  • People with a disability
  • Girls and women
  • Those living in a remote and rural location.

The application process includes a 300 word description of what you’re going to do and a further 300 words on how you’re going to recruit the target audience. Members of the target audience can also apply for the funding themselves in order to visit science venues and events.

When making decisions regarding the funding, the committee don’t take into account the number of people who will be engaged through the project however if the project is working with a smaller number of people they would expect the level of engagement to be deeper.

The fund opened for applications this week and the deadline is the 23rd of November.

There also is a separate Kick Start Grant Scheme for schools to take part in British Science Week (£300 for activities in the school, £700 for those in a school engaging the wider community) which your education partners might be interested in.

However, even if you do not apply for a grant (or are unsuccessful), you can still register a Science Week event with the BSA via their website. Organisations that do this receive a range of support including:

  • access to case studies
  • activity packs, projects and quizzes
  • marketing materials and PR
  • connections with local science volunteers

You can register your event up until middle of February.

SHARE Children and Young People’s Conference 2015

On Wednesday 4th February, SHARE Museums East and ROH & NNF Bridges ran their third annual Children & Young People Conference at Coleridge Community College, Cambridge. “Object Lessons 2- Celebrating Creativity and Partnerships in work with Children and Young People” was attended by museum staff, volunteers and freelancers from throughout the region and the full programme can be found here.

Catherine Hammond, Education and Outreach Officer for Epping Forest and Lowewood Museum Services, shares her thoughts and experiences of the day:

“I had really been in two minds about attending the SHARE conference.  As is so often the case, with so much to do and so little time, a day in the office catching up with current projects seemed a good option. But, once again the conference proved a good reminder of the importance of getting out, sharing ideas and experiences, and most of all being inspired by the huge amount of talent and creativity within the sector.
The day got off to a good start with a warm welcome by Bev Jones, head teacher of Coleridge Community College, our base for the day.  Bev’s commitment to developing creativity and a sense of community amongst the students in her school and recognising the role museums can play in this make her a great advocate for our sector.
The keynote speakers all set clear messages for the day – Susan Raikes, from the British Museum gave a timely reminder that ultimately it is the objects in our collections that are at the centre of memorable, inspirational learning experiences.  Paul Collard gave us some fascinating case studies of putting creativity at the heart of learning, what this can look like and what it can achieve for young people.
The breakout session ‘Why should I bother with arts award’ by Ancient House Museum in Thetford, answered the question very well. I was convinced to give it another go in our museum by the demonstration of very simple but highly effective ways of delivering it as part of an existing programme.  There was also a wonderful bonus presentation by a member of the teenage history club at the museum, a wonderful advocate for the benefits such a group could bring both to young people and the museum itself.  I very much hope they get their funding to visit Japan to develop their project on flint – to inspire such ambition and ideas among young people was a testament to how much confidence this group had given them.
After a good lunch, the breakout session on Lifelines, the Start Hospices project by the Fitzwilliam Museum was a very informed presentation about the value of working with families with life limited children and the practicalities of what such work can involve.  It was particularly interesting to hear how much support was available from practitioners within the hospice movement itself, from psychologists who could help with managing the personal and emotional challenges of working with this group to family workers, art and play therapists.
Jo Roberts’ presentation on establishing a framework for professional development was a timely reminder of how important it is to place a value on our skills and experiences to ensure museums do recognise the value of having  experienced practitioners in learning roles at a time when many museums are facing cutbacks.
The final project reports from SHARE’s Takeover Day Cohort members Francesca Pellegrino at Lowewood Museum and Nollie Cacciatore at Much Hadham Forge Museum, showed how flexible this programme is in terms of how you choose to deliver it, but that having Takeover Day as the focus really helps to get young people on board.
Steph Parmee, from Gainsborough House Museum closed the day with an entertaining and reassuring presentation showing how well even smaller specialist museums including Newmarket Horse Racing Museum have adapted to the challenge of the new curriculum and continue to offer creative learning experiences that directly engage learners with their unique collections.”
The film of Lowewood Museum’s Takeover Day project is available here. Jo Roberts was presenting on the Group for Education in Museums (GEM) new foundation course in Museum Learning, more details of which are available here.