Learning & Engagement Grants For Essex Museums

colchester-alison-stockmarr

Essex Museum Development is offering grants of up to £500 to support the delivery of learning and community engagement using collections.

The grants aim to support local museums to:

  1. Develop relationships with local education providers including schools, colleges and home education groups
  2. Develop new learning and engagement resources
  3. Develop an adult learning offer
  4. Deliver activities which will reach new audiences
  5. Make their venue more accessible for disabled audiences

The funding scheme is open to any Accredited museum (or museum registered as Working Towards Accreditation) within the Essex or Southend-on-Sea local authority boundaries. Please note that to apply you must have attended at least two of the following training days:

It is important to read the guidance document before applying. It contains some suggestions as to what the grant can be used for, but this is not an exhaustive list. Please do get in contact if you wish to discuss your ideas.

To apply, complete this application form and return it to amy.cotterill@essex.gov.uk by 5pm on Tuesday 23rd January 2018

Learning and Engagement application guidance 2018

Click here to download the application form

 

Learning & Engagement Grants For Essex Museums

colchester-alison-stockmarr

Essex Museum Development is offering grants of up to £500 to support the delivery of learning and community engagement using collections.

 

The grants aim to support local museums to:

  1. Develop relationships with local education providers including schools, colleges and home education groups
  2. Develop new learning and engagement resources
  3. Develop an adult learning offer
  4. Deliver activities which will reach new audiences
  5. Make their venue more accessible for disabled audiences

 

The funding scheme is open to any Accredited museum (or museum registered as Working Towards Accreditation) within the Essex or Southend-on-Sea local authority boundaries.

 

It is important to read the guidance document before applying. It contains some suggestions as to what the grant can be used for, but this is not an exhaustive list. Please do get in contact if you wish to discuss your ideas.

 

To apply, complete this application form and return it to amy.cotterill@essex.gov.uk by 5pm on Tuesday 28th February 2017

Guidance Document: learning-and-engagement-application-guidance-2017

Application Form: learning-and-engagement-application-form-2017

 

Snapping The Stiletto: Re-Examining Essex Collections

 

Image courtesy of Essex Police Museum

Image courtesy of Essex Police Museum

The Essex County Council Museum Development has secured a grant of £95, 445 from the Esmée Fairbairn Collections Fund for a two year project working with museums across the county.

 

2018 is the Centenary of the of the Representation of the People Act 1918 which gave the first British women the vote, the 90th anniversary of the Equal Franchise Act 1928 which gave all women the vote and the 50th anniversary of the Dagenham Ford Worker’s Strike. These important national and local anniversaries are serving as a catalyst to explore, record and celebrate the diverse and inspirational stories of Essex women.

For the purposes of this project, we are working with partners from across “historic Essex” including those areas which are now unitary authorities or part of London, thus enabling us to tell interpret both existing collections and the stories discovered through our research as part of the wider story.

We will research and record how Essex women’s lives have changed during the last century and celebrate the stories of individual and groups of women in the county, for example Suffrage campaigners and Dagenham strikers but also women whose stories aren’t yet well known. This may include but not be limited to women who were involved in World War II, gained qualifications at a time when most women were unable to access further education, who entered male dominated professions including the services, those who moved to Essex from around the world and made a home for themselves by overcoming language and cultural differences and those who have raised families during a time of changing expectations for their gender. By highlighting women’s contributions, we will add another layer of understanding to elements of history that the public are possibly more familiar with, for example WWII, and change their perceptions of what took place. Also, through telling the stories of inspiring Essex women, we hope to weaken the negative “Essex Girl” stereotype.

 

Image courtesy of Southend Museums

Image courtesy of Southend Museums

 

 

The project is part of an overarching strand of work called “Snapping the Stiletto: 100 Years of Change”. We will be shortly be submitting further funding applications for oral history and other work, so there are still plenty of opportunities for heritage organisations and other groups to get involved. We will also be recruiting a large number of volunteers during 2017.

 

For more information, to sign up for project updates or to learn how you can get involved in the project, email amy.cotterill@essex.gov.uk

 

 

 

Our museum partners for “Revisiting Essex Collections” are:

  • Braintree Museums
  • Brightlingsea Museum
  • Chelmsford Museum
  • Colchester and Ipswich Museums
  • The Combined Military Services Museum
  • Epping Forest District Museum
  • Essex Fire Museum
  • Essex Police Museum
  • The Museum of Power
  • Redbridge Museum, Ilford
  • Southend Museums Service

Enterprise & Philanthropy: Building Relationships to Fund Museums

Miranda Rowlands, SHARED Enterprise Project Officer, shares updates and highlights from the project’s activity programme:

 

What motivates individuals to support culture and heritage? How do I approach businesses to work in partnership with the museum?  How can we generate more income from commercial operations?  SHARED Enterprise has been helping regional museums answer these questions, working with them to build their capacity and skills to fundraise from private donors, corporate sources, trusts and foundations.

On Wednesday 2 March, SHARED Enterprise hosted a conference at the Museum of London, in partnership with Inspiring a Culture of Philanthropy, another HLF Catalyst Umbrella project delivered by Hampshire Cultural Trust. With Steve Miller, Head of Norfolk Museums Service, presiding as Conference Chair, the day’s programme shared case studies and learning about fundraising and commercial income generation in museums.

The day was attended by 85 delegates from the East of England, Hampshire and as far afield as the Wirral, who have given resoundingly positive feedback about the day. The aim was to show that attracting funds from alternative streams is something that can be done by museums of all types and sizes, as most activities can be scaled to fit the needs of any organisation.

Here’s what people are saying about the event:

“…brilliantly helpful and instructive. Excellent range of presentations and lots of practical ideas for immediate implementation, as well as for longer-term strategic planning.”

“Very good day – informative, stimulating and hugely enjoyable”

“Well organised, co-ordinated and structured. A great day with relevant and useful speakers”

“Very enjoyable event. Well organised and very useful. Excellent speakers.”

Following an inspirational keynote presentation by Peter Maple, Visiting Lecturer and Fundraising Researcher at London South Bank University and St Mary’s University, participants in both projects shared what they have learned. Tony O’Connor from Epping Forest District Museum, (due to re-open on 19th March following a major refurbishment), has recently undertaken a review of the museum’s pricing strategies, charging policies and fundraising strategy.  Kate Axon and Vanessa Trevelyan talked about how Museum Directors and Trustees the Museum of East Anglian Life are working together to develop trustees’ fundraising capacity and promote a positive culture to support fundraising and income generation.  Director of Gainsborough’s House, Mark Bills has been proactive in forging links with neighbouring businesses to put Gainsborough at the heart of Sudbury’s business community.

The afternoon sessions focussed on learning from experience, starting with a particularly useful panel discussion with a fundraising consultant and representatives of three grant-making bodies. The panel shared what they look for in a good funding application, and perhaps more telling, some tips to avoid writing a bad one.  The most memorable applications give a clear and concise explanation of the project, from which the organisation’s passion and enthusiasm shine through.  Surprisingly, the panellists said they still receive a large number of applications which are poorly written, with grammatical and punctuation errors and budgets that don’t add up.  Shockingly, many applicants also commit the cardinal sin of copying and submitting the same application to several different funding bodies, as evidenced by applications received that are addressed to somebody else!  The top 5 tips are:

  • write each application individually – don’t sent batch applications
  • keep it under 2 pages long
  • tell your story clearly and concisely
  • use photographs / diagrams where appropriate
  • check your grammar, punctuation and calculations carefully

We then learned about generating income from alternative streams. Operations Manager for Norwich Museums, Stuart Garner, shared his insight into the various challenges and factors to consider when delivering weddings in heritage buildings.  Venue hire, whether for weddings or other purposes, is for many museums and as-yet untapped income stream, so this was of particular interest to several delegates considering alternative ways to use museum spaces to earn more income.  Jaane Rowehl, Museum Development Officer for the South East Museum Development programme shared her experience of working with television companies filming in museums.  The museum was successful because they were able to respond to the opportunity when it arose, and they negotiated a deal which not only compensated them for their loss of income during a period of closure necessary for the filming but also provided extra income for the use of their location.

Anne Young, Head of Strategic Planning at the Heritage Lottery Fund, rounded off the day with a closing keynote address about HLF’s Strategic Framework, some of the projects supported by HLF and future funding opportunities.

So what did delegates tell us they learnt that will make a difference to their work?

“I have got a much better understanding of the broader meaning of ‘philanthropy’ and, as a result, feeling of greater confidence in exploring this in my museum.”

“Top tips for applications from a funder’s perspective ”

“Keep funders informed of the progress of your project after they have given you funding – even if they don’t ask for it – it helps develop a relationship.”

 “Build relationships and positively promote cause…”

“Embedding a culture of fundraising throughout the organisation.”

If you were not able to attend the conference and would like to know more, presentations from the day are available to download from the SHARED Enterprise resources page, where videos of the day’s sessions will also be available soon.

Here are the next two SHARED Enterprise training events. They are open for booking right now and are absolutely not to be missed:

Becoming more entrepreneurial through partnership working with local businesses, 19 April 2016, 10:00am – 3.30pm The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge

Book now

Developing effective relationships and partnerships with local businesses is a key way that museums can support their efforts to become more entrepreneurial and form stronger links with their local communities, making them more resilient. However this area of work is often one that museums find difficult to approach.

This workshop will be delivered by a group who have been working together over the past year to develop business partnerships. Come and learn from their experience, get practical advice and begin shaping your own action plan.

Speakers will include: Michael Woodward, Chief Operating Officer, York Museums Trust John Lanagan, Chief Executive, Museum of East Anglian Life Caitlin Griffiths, The Museum Consultancy.

 

SHARED Enterprise Funding Fair, 9 May 2016, 10:00am – 4:00pm

The Athenaeum, Bury St Edmunds Book now

A full-day event for anyone with an interest in fundraising for museums and other heritage organisations.

The programme of talks will include speakers from the Heritage Lottery Fund, Arts Council England and the Art Fund. Plus, find out how to use Behavioural Economics to encourage people to donate more, in a very special series of interactive sessions with David Burgess, Co-Director of National Arts Fundraising School.

More speakers will be announced shortly, as well as a list of exhibitors. It’s a great opportunity to come and network with funders and other key museum and heritage stakeholders.

Refreshments and lunch will be provided. Please book early to avoid disappointment.

 

For more information, contact Miranda, SHARED Enterprise Project Officer, on 01603 228993, miranda.rowlands@norfolk.gov.uk.

 

 

What Essex Sounds Like: Soft Launch of Essex Sounds Audio Map

Sarah-Joy Maddeaux, You Are Hear Project Officer at the Essex Record Office, talks about the sounds of our county:

For the past six months, the You Are Hear project team at the Essex Sound and Video Archive has been asking the public what Essex sounds like. Whether stopping innocent passers-by in shopping centres, appealing to the public through newspapers, or calling for suggestions through e-bulletins, we have been asking you what noises you hear in your daily routine; what noises you associate with the county; what sounds represent your community.

Now we have the answer! Well, to a point. We have compiled the results with our sound recordist, Stuart Bowditch. Based on your suggestions, he has been venturing into the far corners of the county, braving all weathers, to capture those soundscapes. And now you can hear some of the results on our audio map, Essex Sounds.

MaldonHunt

The hunt parade through Maldon, 1st January 2016. Image courtesy Stuart Bowditch.

From church bells to firework displays; the sounding of ship’s horns at Tilbury to bring in the New Year to the annual New Year’s hunt parade through Maldon (yes, he managed to capture both, and more besides that day!): see if your suggestion of an Essex sound has been recorded.

In our public surveys about Essex sounds, many people commented on a perceived difference between the north and south of the county. Commonly, people considered the southern part of the county to contain more industrial noises, more hustle and bustle, more crowded atmospheres: with more people speaking with a London or ‘TOWIE accent’. The north was depicted as quieter, more rural, where the people are more likely to speak with a ‘traditional’ Essex accent.

Is this an accurate depiction of the county, or is it over-generalised? Why not consult the Essex Sounds map to see if it reflects this north-south divide?

The map also enables comparisons between old and new sounds of the county. We have uploaded some historic recordings from the Archive. For example, you can listen to an auction at the Chelmsford cattle market in the 1950s.

 

You can then compare it with a recording made on that site in 2015, capturing the busy atmosphere of High Chelmer on a Saturday. Try it out here

 

If your sound suggestion has not yet been added, do not fear: our site is still a work in progress. Stuart will continue to record Essex sounds over the next few months, gradually uploading them to the audio map. We will also keep adding historic recordings as they are digitised, as part of this Heritage Lottery Funded project. We are happy to receive further suggestions of places and events to record, though we will not be able to include everything within the scope of the project.

In the next phase, our web developers will build an app version. By the autumn, you will be able to take the map on location, listening to the clips in the very spot where they were first recorded.

In the meantime, why not contribute your own recording to the site? We want the map to fully reflect your experiences of what Essex sounds like. You will find instructions on the ‘contribute’ page, but please get in touch if you have any questions.

We would be delighted to talk to any museums that want to use the Essex Sounds map for engagement activities. Maybe you want to host a recording day, encouraging people to venture out into the surrounding area with their phones and tablets to capture what your community sounds like in 2016, then upload the fruits to the map. Or perhaps a workshop is more up your street: inviting theorists and practitioners to review the material and discuss how the sounds of Essex are changing, and what this means about bigger socio-cultural shifts. How does sound affect our sense of place? What sounds are absent in our collections, and how can we redress that for future generations?

We would love to hear any feedback you have, so that we can continue to improve the site and pass on your comments to our website developers, Community Sites. Please be gentle with us, though: we are still in the development phase! We would also be grateful for any volunteers to test the map more extensively, particularly if you are using accessibility software. Please get in touch find out more.

For more information about the You Are Hear project, you can visit the project site. You can also listen to more recordings on our Soundcloud channel.

 

From summer 2016 to summer 2018, we will be showcasing a selection of our recordings on interactive touchscreen kiosks and listening benches that will tour public locations across the county. We are also looking for volunteers to help us with installing listening benches in the following areas:

  • Burnham-on-Crouch
  • Chelmsford
  • Clacton-on-Sea
  • Coggeshall
  • Epping
  • Great Baddow
  • Great Chesterford / Clavering
  • Southend-on-Sea
  • Witham

Please get in touch if you want to be a part of our tour, or if you can help with the community benches.

Heritage Lottery Fund

 

 

Funding For British Science Week

On Wednesday, the British Science Association gave a presentation at the SHARE Regional Learning Network which I thought might be of interest which I thought would be of interest to many of you…

What Is The British Science Association?
British Science AssociationThe BSA, previously known as British Association for the Advancement of Science, was founded in 1831.

Like history and the arts, science has a “professional class” – people who do it for a living. However far few people see science as something you can has as a hobby or take-part in informally.  The BSA’s goal is to change this by engaging the wider public with science through events, activities and projects. The best known of these is the annual British Science Festival, which takes place in a different city each tear and dates back to 1831. However, they also offer CREST Awards for young people (which I will be writing about in another post next week), and British Science Week.

Why Is This Relevant To Museums?

The definition of “science” used by the BSA is a very broad one. It includes natural history, medicine, archaeology, forensics, engineering… in fact most museums will have something in their collection which is applicable. The BSA offer grants of up to £500 for community organisations, including museums (even local authority ones!) to run events during British Science Week that are targeted at an audience which is traditionally under-represented in science.

How Can Museums Get Involved?

The 2016 British Science Week will take place between the 11th and 20th of March. The audiences they particularly want to reach out to through their Community Grant Scheme are:

  • Black and Minority Ethnic Groups
  • Those of a low socioeconomic status
  • Young people with anti-social behaviour including those who are not in education employment or training (NEET)
  • People with a disability
  • Girls and women
  • Those living in a remote and rural location.

The application process includes a 300 word description of what you’re going to do and a further 300 words on how you’re going to recruit the target audience. Members of the target audience can also apply for the funding themselves in order to visit science venues and events.

When making decisions regarding the funding, the committee don’t take into account the number of people who will be engaged through the project however if the project is working with a smaller number of people they would expect the level of engagement to be deeper.

The fund opened for applications this week and the deadline is the 23rd of November.

There also is a separate Kick Start Grant Scheme for schools to take part in British Science Week (£300 for activities in the school, £700 for those in a school engaging the wider community) which your education partners might be interested in.

However, even if you do not apply for a grant (or are unsuccessful), you can still register a Science Week event with the BSA via their website. Organisations that do this receive a range of support including:

  • access to case studies
  • activity packs, projects and quizzes
  • marketing materials and PR
  • connections with local science volunteers

You can register your event up until middle of February.

Culture in Essex Small Grants

Participants in Saffron Walden's Egypt Project

The Culture in Essex Small Grants Schemes are funded and run by Essex County Council, offering one-off project support to arts and culture projects within Essex (excluding Southend and Thurrock).
 
Deadlines fall on the 31 March and 31 October each year and awards of up to £2,500 are offered to projects which meet the schemes criteria. 

With plenty of time left before the October deadline, Gemma Tully from Saffron Walden Museum shares hare experiences of the scheme:
Project participantsI have experience of applying for and working on two projects funded by the ECC small grants scheme over the last 3 years. Compared to other funding applications, the ECC form is clear and straightforward and takes a matter of hours rather than days to complete. The Small Grants team and MDO are really helpful and are willing to discuss projects before you begin applying, they will also read through draft versions and/or offer advice over the phone if you ask nicely!

The two projects that we have had success with have been strongly collaborative and involved a number of individuals from different backgrounds from within Uttlesford (our local authority district).

The first project I co-ordinated was called ‘Re-imagining Egypt’. This was an art/archaeology project between the museum (and our Egyptian collection), an Egyptian artist and over 100 local school-aged children (aged 7-18) from two different local schools, one museum youth club and a local home-school group. The project focused on looking at the entire human history of Egypt, from the Stone Age up to today, and getting children to rethink their ideas of Egypt’s history so as not to see it purely as the land of the Pharaohs. The objects that we studied formed the basis of artwork that the children created with input from Khaled Hafez, an Egyptian artist, as well as museum staff. The artworks focused on different themes which run through the whole of Egyptian history: symbols/writing, the human figure, gods/religion and the use of colour in society. The artworks reinterpreted this history through these themes to represent a more inclusive vision of Egypt’s past. The children’s artworks, alongside art by the Egyptian artist Khaled Hafez and Egyptian artefacts from the Museum’s collection (as well as some artefacts loaned by the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge) were then incorporated into an exhibition, co-curated by the children, Khaled and museum staff, which brought together 300,000 years of Egyptian history and contemporary art works that re-imagined Egypt’s history as one integrated story, rather than simply prioritising Pharaonic Egypt above all else. The children had their own private view, designed their own posters and got involved with publicity campaigns, meaning that they also learn about the entire museum exhibition process. The exhibition was a great success, with visitor numbers increasing significantly during the 4 months the exhibition was on display. More information is available here.

Community CuratorsThe second project is currently underway. ‘Uttlesford: A community of Collectors’ is a joint curatorial venture between the museum and local residents who wanted to showcase their collections to a wider audience. After a public call was put out, a group of collectors were selected to take part in workshops, learn how to care for and curate their collections and finally exhibit and publicise them in a temporary exhibition. From walking sticks to jubilee memorabilia, animal skulls to national dolls, a range of collectors aged from 11-85 have taken part. While the first round of collectors’ exhibition is only just under way, there has already been significant interest from the local public, with many visitors coming just to see friends and families collections on display. We are currently working with the collectors who are in round two and their exhibition will open in late November of this year. Both staff and local collectors have found the experience really rewarding and learnt a great deal from each other and it is something that we are hoping to sustain in the form of a community exhibition case once this particular project draws to a close.

Saffron Walden community Exhibition

 

Please do visit the grants website or contact me for more information before applying.