Learning & Engagement Grants For Essex Museums

colchester-alison-stockmarr

Essex Museum Development is offering grants of up to £500 to support the delivery of learning and community engagement using collections.

The grants aim to support local museums to:

  1. Develop relationships with local education providers including schools, colleges and home education groups
  2. Develop new learning and engagement resources
  3. Develop an adult learning offer
  4. Deliver activities which will reach new audiences
  5. Make their venue more accessible for disabled audiences

The funding scheme is open to any Accredited museum (or museum registered as Working Towards Accreditation) within the Essex or Southend-on-Sea local authority boundaries. Please note that to apply you must have attended at least two of the following training days:

It is important to read the guidance document before applying. It contains some suggestions as to what the grant can be used for, but this is not an exhaustive list. Please do get in contact if you wish to discuss your ideas.

To apply, complete this application form and return it to amy.cotterill@essex.gov.uk by 5pm on Tuesday 23rd January 2018

Learning and Engagement application guidance 2018

Click here to download the application form

 

Museums Association Conference: Bursaries for First-Time Attendees

Debating modern ethics

Debating modern ethics at the Museums Association Conference, 2014

2017-application-for-ma-conference – V2

**STOP PRESS** – DEADLINE EXTENDED TO MIDNIGHT, FRIDAY 7TH JULY

 

I am able to offer two bursaries for first-time attendees to this November’s Museums Association Conference. The three-day annual MA Conference is the biggest gathering of museum staff and volunteers in the country and is a fantastic opportunity to learn about the work other organisations are doing, discuss issues affecting the sector and meet colleagues from around the country (and the world!).

Alongside the Conference is a “Marketplace” where you can meet suppliers of museum services and equipment. There are also usually fringe events such as tweet-ups, networking dinners and “unconference” break-out sessions.

Each bursary is targeted at a different area of the workforce:

  • Established professional

Those who have been in paid employment in the sector for more than 7 years (i.e. who began work before November 2010). This could be full-time or part-time paid work and doesn’t include paid traineeships. They should have been working at their current museum for at least six months by the date of their application.

  • Museum volunteer

Those who have regularly volunteered at an Essex museum for at least six months by the date of their application. This can be within any role in the museum.

The full eligibility details are outlined within the guidance document, but you do have to work or volunteer at an Accredited (or Working Towards Accreditation) Essex Museum.

You may find it useful to read the Top 10 Tips for Attendees and a summary of the 2015 Conference.

Please read the guidance notes before applying. The deadline for applications is midnight on Friday 7th July. Please contact me if you have any questions.

Click to download the application guidance

Click to download the application form

Autism and Museums

NAS-logo.jpg

Freelancer Jo Gillam has been supporting Chelmsford Museum to improve access for autistic visitors. Here she gives us an introduction to autism and changes museums can make…

World Autism Awareness Week (27th March-2nd April 2017) is a good time to consider how to make your museum more autism-friendly….

30 years ago, my brother was labelled as unfriendly, difficult, and having a ‘mental handicap’. Today, he’s described as having autism plus learning disabilities. Autism is certainly a word that many people recognise now but how many know what it means? How can your museum be more welcoming to people with autism and their families?

What is autism and who can have it?

Autism is a lifelong condition thought to be caused by a combination of genetics, brain development and part of the natural variety among brains. i.e. ‘neurodiversity’. It affects 1 in a 100 people in the UK – women as well as men. There’s no evidence that it’s more prevalent than before or that any ethnic or socio-economic group has a greater propensity to it than others.

Autism isn’t a learning difficulty, a learning disability, or a mental health problem. Some people with autism do have mental health issues, not least because they can find life extremely stressful. About 50% of people with autism have a learning disability. Sometimes this is severe but all people with autism can learn and develop with the right support. About 10% of people with autism have high intelligence (the preferred term is ‘high functioning’). Until recently, this was diagnosed as Asperger syndrome which is a term still commonly used. For some, far from being a disorder or disability, autism offers valuable abilities and unique perceptions. Examples of exceptional autistic contributors to society almost certainly include Mozart, Einstein and Turing.

How does autism affect everyday life?

Autism affects how a person processes information, relates to others, makes sense of the world and how they experience it through their senses. To people who don’t have autism, these differences are invisible. What they notice is behaviour caused by the difficulties created by a mis-match between autistic differences and the surrounding world. How people react to this behaviour makes a big difference to the emotional well-being of people with autism, who often feel excluded from social activities.

How can your museum help people with autism?

Some of the most effective changes you can make are also the cheapest!

  • Promote patience and understanding when someone behaves unexpectedly in your museum.
  • Limit the number of questions you ask and allow more time than may seem comfortable for the person to reply.
  • Be direct. People with autism commonly take things literally so try not to cause confusion by using statements like “I’ll be back in a second”.
  • Don’t feel offended if someone doesn’t engage with your friendly small talk as this is something people with autism can find uncomfortable.

Parents often feel that they are judged to be inadequate when their autistic child has a meltdown. The real reason may be that the child is being overloaded with sensory input. For an insight into how this feels, take a look at this powerful little film made by the National Autistic Society (NAS): Too Much Information

Small changes to your museum can make a big difference and help other visitors at the same time.

It can seem daunting to make your museum more autism-friendly, when autism is so diverse. After all, how do you manage hypo (low) sensitivity and hyper (high) sensitivity to certain stimuli such as light and sound within the same venue? The answer is flexibility and choice.

  • Make your light and volume settings adjustable. If this isn’t possible yet, provide visual and written information so that visitors can seek out or avoid particular areas.
  • Advertise times when your museum is most quiet or open it for special Early Bird/Night Owl sessions when you turn down/off some sensory experiences.
  • Ideally, offer a low sensory area where someone who feels overloaded can take a break.
  • Loan relaxing objects like stress balls and stimulating, sensory kits which can be carried around.

Most visitors or their carers will know what they find challenging and may bring their own aids such as ear defenders. At Chelmsford Museum, we offer free pairs just in case.

Changes made to help visitors with autism, often improve conditions for other people with access needs. Avoiding ‘busy’ floor or wall patterns, for example, also helps people who suffer from certain visual impairments, dementia, epilepsy or migraines.

Full and honest pre-visit information can be a key to unlocking future visits

Potential visitors with particular needs can come to expect poor access and so not consider coming. Consequently, providing clear, accessible pre-visit information (and advertising this) is crucial. For people with autism, who often find breaks from routine and unfamiliar situations intimidating, having floor plans, images and outlines of what they can expect at a museum, can make the difference between whether or not they visit.

Museums such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York), the Science Museum, and the Natural History Museum (London) are leading the way in autism accessibility. These and other examples are listed by blogger Tincture of Museum.

On a smaller scale, Chelmsford Museum is developing its own resources aimed at visitors with autism and their families. We’re working towards achieving the NAS’s Autism Friendly Award. I’m teaching the team how they can make the museum more autism-friendly and would be delighted to provide training elsewhere. We’re also holding an event for World Autism Awareness Day (1pm-4pm 2nd April 2017) aimed at everyone. It would be great to see you there!

For further information, try these organisations:

The National Autistic Society | – NAS

Autism in museums | Network Autism

Ambitious about Autism

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Jo Gillam, Freelance Heritage Professional

Mob 07754 130145   

Email: 1joprice@gmail.com

Twitter: @1accessforall

If you would like to learn more about how your museum can support people with autism, Jo will be talking about her work with Chelmsford at this event in June.

Does Your Museum Need A Firearms License?

 

The Home Office is currently consulting with the public about the cost of firearms licenses.

“It is proposed the fee for a museum firearms licence will be £1,440, and the licence will be valid for five years. The current fee for a museum licence is £200. The renewal fee is to be revised to £1,240, with fees for alterations to valid licences to be changed to between £110 and £780.”
Obviously this would be a huge increase (over 600%) and could hit museums very hard, but does your museum need a license?

 

Given the large number of military-themed museums in Essex and the social history collections which may contain guns, I have taken advice on this matter from William Brown, National Security Advisor at the Arts Council.

 

You need a firearms license if your collection contains live firearms, although there is an exception for historic firearms. However, no definition is in place as to what constitutes a “historic firearm”. The decision is made at the discretion of your local police.

 

If the guns in your collection have been deactivated, you do not need a firearms license.

 

Your museum is eligible for a firearms license if:

  • It has as its purpose, or one of its purposes, “the preservation for the public benefit of a collection of historic, artistic or scientific interest which includes or is to include firearms”
  • It is maintained wholly or mainly out of money provided by Parliament or a local authority
  • It is Accredited by the Arts Council (nb. This means fully Accredited and not “Working Towards” Accreditation)

 

If you wish to contribute to the consultation regarding the increase in costs for museum firearms licenses (by over 600%), you can do so here.

 

The Home Office Guidance on Firearms Licensing Law can be found here.

 

The Firearms Security Handbook, which includes guidance on museum storage and display of weapons and ammunition, can be found here.

Please do get in touch with me if you have any questions.

Museum Development Officer – Maternity Cover

Museum Development Officer (Maternity Cover), Essex County Council, Secondment Opportunity / Fixed Term Contract until Nov 2017

Full Time, 37 hours per week (flexible, evenings and weekends may be required), Salary £28,500, Deadline for applications: Midnight, Weds 22nd March

 

Love museums? Creative? Enjoy working with people? Essex County Council is seeking maternity cover for the role of Museum Development Officer. The post serves as the strategic lead for museums in the county, including project development, advice and support.

At the core of the role, you will provide advice and guidance to local museums, regarding organisational resilience, collections care and audiences, so experience in at least one of these areas is essential.

 

Working within the Cultural Development Team, you will also lead on delivery if the “Snapping the Stiletto” women’s history project, the “Wikipedians In Residence Essex” (WIRE) project and chair the county’s Heritage Education Group. You will also be responsible for developing the local training and activity offer, in partnership with Museums Essex and SHARE Museums East.

 

Please note that the post is also available as a secondment to local authority employees.

 

The role description can be accessed here: https://essexcc.taleo.net/careersection/ecc_external/jobdetail.ftl?job=10754&lang=en

 

  • Deadline for applications: Midnight, Wednesday 22nd March
  • Interviews: Friday 31st March or Monday 3rd April
  • Start date: Monday 24th April (subject to reference checks etc)
  • End date: Friday 24th November

 

If you have any questions about the role, please feel free to get in touch (amy.cotterill@essex.gov.uk)

Learning & Engagement Grants For Essex Museums

colchester-alison-stockmarr

Essex Museum Development is offering grants of up to £500 to support the delivery of learning and community engagement using collections.

 

The grants aim to support local museums to:

  1. Develop relationships with local education providers including schools, colleges and home education groups
  2. Develop new learning and engagement resources
  3. Develop an adult learning offer
  4. Deliver activities which will reach new audiences
  5. Make their venue more accessible for disabled audiences

 

The funding scheme is open to any Accredited museum (or museum registered as Working Towards Accreditation) within the Essex or Southend-on-Sea local authority boundaries.

 

It is important to read the guidance document before applying. It contains some suggestions as to what the grant can be used for, but this is not an exhaustive list. Please do get in contact if you wish to discuss your ideas.

 

To apply, complete this application form and return it to amy.cotterill@essex.gov.uk by 5pm on Tuesday 28th February 2017

Guidance Document: learning-and-engagement-application-guidance-2017

Application Form: learning-and-engagement-application-form-2017

 

Sign-Up For Summer: Museum Explorer Passport 2016

Museum Explorer

In 2015, a pilot project ran across Bedfordshire, Essex and Hertfordshire. The evaluation of the pilot project has led to some revisions of the original project, which is being run for a second year and expanded to be open to more museums, and to run for a longer period of time. The project has also been simplified and will be accompanied by more direct marketing to provide additional support to participating museums.

 

The project is open to all museums across Hertfordshire, Essex and Bedfordshire who will be offering activities for children during the 2016 May half term and / or summer holidays. There is a fee of £50 to participate in the 2016 project, which will go towards supporting the cost of the project.

Children will be given a Passport and a series (approx. 6) of simple challenges to complete during the summer holidays; e.g. ‘visit a museum you have not been to before’ ‘take part in a workshop involving clay’ Challenges will be open enough to allow children to have a good choice of museums to visit in order to achieve all of them. Each museum listing in the passport with have a blank space where museums will be able to ‘stamp’ the passports when children visit them. There will also be a blank space next to the challenges that can be stamped.

Museums will be provided with everything they need to participate: blank passports, stamps, stickers, flyers and posters, press release template, briefing note (to be shared will all staff and volunteers), and other supporting information. Alongside this will be a programme of marketing via a project specific website, linked to all partner museum websites. Social media will be utilised and museums will be supported to develop their skills in this area. In 2016 we will also advertising in relevant local publications.
Cost
To help support the project, we are asking museums to contribute £50 per site towards the costs. In the 2015 pilot museums received £177 worth of resources and support per site, so this is a good return on your investment!

We can also invoice you in either March or April, depending on which financial year’s budget you would like to use.
Project timetable

  1. Recruit museums to the project

    The deadline for applications is Friday 11th December 2015

     

  2. Website copy

    There are two deadlines for providing information to be included on the website:

    For events in May and June: Friday 22nd April 2016

    For events in July and August: Wednesday 8th June 2016

     

  3. Launch event

    Essex: Monday 25th April

    Herts and Beds: Wednesday 4th May 2016

     

  4. Project goes live!

    The project will be fully live from Saturday 28th May 2016

     

  5. Ongoing promotion

    Via website, social media, listings publications and websites, and museums’ own distribution lists. Each museum will be given a supply of branded stickers for participating children. Events across the May half term holiday and entire summer holidays will be promoted.

  6. Evaluation

    The project will be evaluated by the steering group, which has been expanded from the pilot project to include representation from museums directly. This will take place in September 2016, participating museums will be asked to fill in a short questionnaire and collect minimal data through noting down any anecdotal feedback from your visitors during the project.

To apply, complete this form and email it to me by Friday 11th December.