Does Your Museum Need A Firearms License?

 

The Home Office is currently consulting with the public about the cost of firearms licenses.

“It is proposed the fee for a museum firearms licence will be £1,440, and the licence will be valid for five years. The current fee for a museum licence is £200. The renewal fee is to be revised to £1,240, with fees for alterations to valid licences to be changed to between £110 and £780.”
Obviously this would be a huge increase (over 600%) and could hit museums very hard, but does your museum need a license?

 

Given the large number of military-themed museums in Essex and the social history collections which may contain guns, I have taken advice on this matter from William Brown, National Security Advisor at the Arts Council.

 

You need a firearms license if your collection contains live firearms, although there is an exception for historic firearms. However, no definition is in place as to what constitutes a “historic firearm”. The decision is made at the discretion of your local police.

 

If the guns in your collection have been deactivated, you do not need a firearms license.

 

Your museum is eligible for a firearms license if:

  • It has as its purpose, or one of its purposes, “the preservation for the public benefit of a collection of historic, artistic or scientific interest which includes or is to include firearms”
  • It is maintained wholly or mainly out of money provided by Parliament or a local authority
  • It is Accredited by the Arts Council (nb. This means fully Accredited and not “Working Towards” Accreditation)

 

If you wish to contribute to the consultation regarding the increase in costs for museum firearms licenses (by over 600%), you can do so here.

 

The Home Office Guidance on Firearms Licensing Law can be found here.

 

The Firearms Security Handbook, which includes guidance on museum storage and display of weapons and ammunition, can be found here.

Please do get in touch with me if you have any questions.

Museum Development Officer – Maternity Cover

Museum Development Officer (Maternity Cover), Essex County Council, Secondment Opportunity / Fixed Term Contract until Nov 2017

Full Time, 37 hours per week (flexible, evenings and weekends may be required), Salary £28,500, Deadline for applications: Midnight, Weds 22nd March

 

Love museums? Creative? Enjoy working with people? Essex County Council is seeking maternity cover for the role of Museum Development Officer. The post serves as the strategic lead for museums in the county, including project development, advice and support.

At the core of the role, you will provide advice and guidance to local museums, regarding organisational resilience, collections care and audiences, so experience in at least one of these areas is essential.

 

Working within the Cultural Development Team, you will also lead on delivery if the “Snapping the Stiletto” women’s history project, the “Wikipedians In Residence Essex” (WIRE) project and chair the county’s Heritage Education Group. You will also be responsible for developing the local training and activity offer, in partnership with Museums Essex and SHARE Museums East.

 

Please note that the post is also available as a secondment to local authority employees.

 

The role description can be accessed here: https://essexcc.taleo.net/careersection/ecc_external/jobdetail.ftl?job=10754&lang=en

 

  • Deadline for applications: Midnight, Wednesday 22nd March
  • Interviews: Friday 31st March or Monday 3rd April
  • Start date: Monday 24th April (subject to reference checks etc)
  • End date: Friday 24th November

 

If you have any questions about the role, please feel free to get in touch (amy.cotterill@essex.gov.uk)

Learning & Engagement Grants For Essex Museums

colchester-alison-stockmarr

Essex Museum Development is offering grants of up to £500 to support the delivery of learning and community engagement using collections.

 

The grants aim to support local museums to:

  1. Develop relationships with local education providers including schools, colleges and home education groups
  2. Develop new learning and engagement resources
  3. Develop an adult learning offer
  4. Deliver activities which will reach new audiences
  5. Make their venue more accessible for disabled audiences

 

The funding scheme is open to any Accredited museum (or museum registered as Working Towards Accreditation) within the Essex or Southend-on-Sea local authority boundaries.

 

It is important to read the guidance document before applying. It contains some suggestions as to what the grant can be used for, but this is not an exhaustive list. Please do get in contact if you wish to discuss your ideas.

 

To apply, complete this application form and return it to amy.cotterill@essex.gov.uk by 5pm on Tuesday 28th February 2017

Guidance Document: learning-and-engagement-application-guidance-2017

Application Form: learning-and-engagement-application-form-2017

 

Lead Roof Thefts

Stephen Armson-Smith, Crime Prevention Tactical Advisor with Essex Police, advises on how to improve the security of your historic lead roof:

Around the county we are seeing a number of thefts of lead from roofs again from churches, historic buildings and also some more modern buildings too. All too often the theft of lead from a roof is only discovered after a downpour of rain and then the value of the theft is often exceeded by the value of the water ingress damage, sometimes with heritage properties irreversible. For this reason it is important to know your building, where those attractive metals have been used and check regularly that these are intact.

I have listed below a few crime prevention tips in relation to metal theft, but not all will apply to your property as each location may have site specific issues:

  1. Make it difficult for the thief; where possible remove any climbing aids.
  2. Make it difficult for the thief; metals can be heavy so make them walk a distance by securing gates when possible, and keep wheel barrows and wheelie bins locked away.
  3. Make it difficult for the thief; keep sheds and outbuildings secure with good locks (see www.soldsecure.com ), it adds insult to injury if they have used your tools and ladders.
  4. Maximise surveillance by sympathetically cutting back shrubs and trees where possible.
  5. Cultivate the neighbours to watch over your property and report any suspicious activity whilst it is happening, crime being committed 999, after the event 101.
  6. External lighting for security? If someone will see what is being lit up or notice the lights have come on if PIR activated light it, if not the only person to benefit from lighting is the thief.
  7. Illusion of occupancy – a light and radio left on inside ect.
  8. Consider using a forensic marker suitable for roofs (see www.securedbydesign.com ), and if you have it ensure that you have clear signage at possible climb points like downpipes and at your perimeter.
  9. Consider a roof top alarm and possibly CCTV (see www.nsi.org.uk or www.ssaib.org ); again if you have security flaunt it, ensure you have clear signage displayed.
  10. Consider planting prickly shrubs at possible climb points and to reinforce boundaries to deter the thief.
  11. Consider the use of anti-climb paints, but remember not below 2m and signage must be displayed.

Further useful advice can be found on the internet including these webpages:

https://content.historicengland.org.uk/images-books/publications/theft-metal-church-buildings/theft-metal-church-buildings.pdf/

http://thecrimepreventionwebsite.com/other-crime-prevention/728/metal-theft/

If you know who is committing crime contact the Police using the 101 non-emergency number or call Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111

 

For more information on local heritage crime, read this previous post about the Essex Heritage Watch

Periscope and the Paraloid Sandwich: Upcoming Demonstration and How To Access It

(@EssexMDO)photorealistic_logo

One of the most common techniques for writing an identifying number on a museum object is a technique known as the “Paraloid Sandwich”. It involves writing the number between two layers of a chemical varnish.

 

Emma Cook, Museum Development Officer for Bedfordshire, and I have become aware that while YouTube is populated with numerous videos demonstrating methods for labelling objects for which the Sandwich isn’t appropriate (e.g. costume collections), this technique isn’t covered.

 

However, rather than just create a video, we thought we’d experiment with the streaming app called Periscope. Periscope you to broadcast video live and people following you on the app or who have clicked a link on Twitter can watch and even send in questions. The video then stays on Periscope for 24 hours. However, we will also then be able to upload it to YouTube, where it will be available for anyone to watch.

 

Therefore I am very happy to announce that Emma and I will be live-streaming a Paraloid Sandwich demonstration on Wednesday 25th May. We will repeat it 4 times, so you can log in, watch demonstrations and ask questions at 12:00, 12:30, 13:00 and 13:30 (British Summer Time).

 

So, how can you view our demonstration and ask questions?

 

  1. Download the free Periscope app to your mobile or tablet and set up an account
  2. “Follow” me (EssexMDO)
  3. Have the app or tablet connected to the internet between 12pm and 2pm on Wednesday 25th May

Additionally, a link will post on my Twitter account (@EssexMDO) every time we go live. You can click that link to watch along if you have Google Chrome as your web browser (Internet Explorer doesn’t work).

 

If you want to watch, but can’t get online at that time, it will be available to watch for 24 hours via the Periscope app.

If you do not have access to the app, we will then be making the video available as soon as possible via the SHARE Museums East YouTube account. Links to the film will be posted on this site and others.

Essex Belongs To Us – Call For Partners

Malcolm Burgess is leading on an interesting new project and is looking for museums to get involved:

 

Are you involved with an Essex museum, gallery or anything similar?

essex belongsWe’re the project managers for the new Arts Council England creative writing project Essex Belongs To Us starting soon. Our aim is to involve as many people as possible in writing about Essex in as creative a way as possible, with our own workshops in Essex, Southend and Thurrock libraries and a published book at the end of it, with a performance at the Essex Book Festival.

 

The project will run from April 2016 – March 2017.

 

We’re keen to know if you’ll be running museum or gallery workshops of any kind of your own for writers involving some kind of interaction with your collection, exhibits, resources or whatever.

 

If you are, we’d love to include full details on our website and to encourage as many writers as possible to attend. It will be an ideal way to promote your workshops further – and to help new writing from Essex.

 

Please send full details (or for more information) to malcolm.burgess3@btopenworld.com

Enterprise & Philanthropy: Building Relationships to Fund Museums

Miranda Rowlands, SHARED Enterprise Project Officer, shares updates and highlights from the project’s activity programme:

 

What motivates individuals to support culture and heritage? How do I approach businesses to work in partnership with the museum?  How can we generate more income from commercial operations?  SHARED Enterprise has been helping regional museums answer these questions, working with them to build their capacity and skills to fundraise from private donors, corporate sources, trusts and foundations.

On Wednesday 2 March, SHARED Enterprise hosted a conference at the Museum of London, in partnership with Inspiring a Culture of Philanthropy, another HLF Catalyst Umbrella project delivered by Hampshire Cultural Trust. With Steve Miller, Head of Norfolk Museums Service, presiding as Conference Chair, the day’s programme shared case studies and learning about fundraising and commercial income generation in museums.

The day was attended by 85 delegates from the East of England, Hampshire and as far afield as the Wirral, who have given resoundingly positive feedback about the day. The aim was to show that attracting funds from alternative streams is something that can be done by museums of all types and sizes, as most activities can be scaled to fit the needs of any organisation.

Here’s what people are saying about the event:

“…brilliantly helpful and instructive. Excellent range of presentations and lots of practical ideas for immediate implementation, as well as for longer-term strategic planning.”

“Very good day – informative, stimulating and hugely enjoyable”

“Well organised, co-ordinated and structured. A great day with relevant and useful speakers”

“Very enjoyable event. Well organised and very useful. Excellent speakers.”

Following an inspirational keynote presentation by Peter Maple, Visiting Lecturer and Fundraising Researcher at London South Bank University and St Mary’s University, participants in both projects shared what they have learned. Tony O’Connor from Epping Forest District Museum, (due to re-open on 19th March following a major refurbishment), has recently undertaken a review of the museum’s pricing strategies, charging policies and fundraising strategy.  Kate Axon and Vanessa Trevelyan talked about how Museum Directors and Trustees the Museum of East Anglian Life are working together to develop trustees’ fundraising capacity and promote a positive culture to support fundraising and income generation.  Director of Gainsborough’s House, Mark Bills has been proactive in forging links with neighbouring businesses to put Gainsborough at the heart of Sudbury’s business community.

The afternoon sessions focussed on learning from experience, starting with a particularly useful panel discussion with a fundraising consultant and representatives of three grant-making bodies. The panel shared what they look for in a good funding application, and perhaps more telling, some tips to avoid writing a bad one.  The most memorable applications give a clear and concise explanation of the project, from which the organisation’s passion and enthusiasm shine through.  Surprisingly, the panellists said they still receive a large number of applications which are poorly written, with grammatical and punctuation errors and budgets that don’t add up.  Shockingly, many applicants also commit the cardinal sin of copying and submitting the same application to several different funding bodies, as evidenced by applications received that are addressed to somebody else!  The top 5 tips are:

  • write each application individually – don’t sent batch applications
  • keep it under 2 pages long
  • tell your story clearly and concisely
  • use photographs / diagrams where appropriate
  • check your grammar, punctuation and calculations carefully

We then learned about generating income from alternative streams. Operations Manager for Norwich Museums, Stuart Garner, shared his insight into the various challenges and factors to consider when delivering weddings in heritage buildings.  Venue hire, whether for weddings or other purposes, is for many museums and as-yet untapped income stream, so this was of particular interest to several delegates considering alternative ways to use museum spaces to earn more income.  Jaane Rowehl, Museum Development Officer for the South East Museum Development programme shared her experience of working with television companies filming in museums.  The museum was successful because they were able to respond to the opportunity when it arose, and they negotiated a deal which not only compensated them for their loss of income during a period of closure necessary for the filming but also provided extra income for the use of their location.

Anne Young, Head of Strategic Planning at the Heritage Lottery Fund, rounded off the day with a closing keynote address about HLF’s Strategic Framework, some of the projects supported by HLF and future funding opportunities.

So what did delegates tell us they learnt that will make a difference to their work?

“I have got a much better understanding of the broader meaning of ‘philanthropy’ and, as a result, feeling of greater confidence in exploring this in my museum.”

“Top tips for applications from a funder’s perspective ”

“Keep funders informed of the progress of your project after they have given you funding – even if they don’t ask for it – it helps develop a relationship.”

 “Build relationships and positively promote cause…”

“Embedding a culture of fundraising throughout the organisation.”

If you were not able to attend the conference and would like to know more, presentations from the day are available to download from the SHARED Enterprise resources page, where videos of the day’s sessions will also be available soon.

Here are the next two SHARED Enterprise training events. They are open for booking right now and are absolutely not to be missed:

Becoming more entrepreneurial through partnership working with local businesses, 19 April 2016, 10:00am – 3.30pm The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge

Book now

Developing effective relationships and partnerships with local businesses is a key way that museums can support their efforts to become more entrepreneurial and form stronger links with their local communities, making them more resilient. However this area of work is often one that museums find difficult to approach.

This workshop will be delivered by a group who have been working together over the past year to develop business partnerships. Come and learn from their experience, get practical advice and begin shaping your own action plan.

Speakers will include: Michael Woodward, Chief Operating Officer, York Museums Trust John Lanagan, Chief Executive, Museum of East Anglian Life Caitlin Griffiths, The Museum Consultancy.

 

SHARED Enterprise Funding Fair, 9 May 2016, 10:00am – 4:00pm

The Athenaeum, Bury St Edmunds Book now

A full-day event for anyone with an interest in fundraising for museums and other heritage organisations.

The programme of talks will include speakers from the Heritage Lottery Fund, Arts Council England and the Art Fund. Plus, find out how to use Behavioural Economics to encourage people to donate more, in a very special series of interactive sessions with David Burgess, Co-Director of National Arts Fundraising School.

More speakers will be announced shortly, as well as a list of exhibitors. It’s a great opportunity to come and network with funders and other key museum and heritage stakeholders.

Refreshments and lunch will be provided. Please book early to avoid disappointment.

 

For more information, contact Miranda, SHARED Enterprise Project Officer, on 01603 228993, miranda.rowlands@norfolk.gov.uk.

 

 

#InstaEssex: Capture the Culture

#InstaEssex LogoWhat is it?
Set up by Essex County Council’s Cultural Team, #InstaEssex is a primarily a photography competition encouraging residents of / and visitors to Essex to take shots of “What does ‘Essex Culture’ mean to you?”

Entrants are encouraged to interpret the theme ‘Capture the Culture’ as they like. The judging panel will be looking for images with an architectural or activity theme that captures part of the culture of Essex*.

15 winners will be selected to have their images shown in an exhibition at National Rail’s Liverpool Street Station and Abellio Greater Anglia’s branch line station waiting rooms across Essex.

Prize money of £1000, £500 and £250 will be awarded to the top three entries.

 

The competition opened at the end of November and closes on Monday 15 February 2016, the exhibition will launch from the end of March – early June 2016 (dates tbc).

The competition is open to all whether they’re an expert or amateur photographer, any age, living in Essex or just visiting. Applicants can enter by clicking the ‘submit an entry’ button at the base of this page. Entrants fees are £5 per image (up to 4) or £15 for 5 images**.

Due to the display space at Liverpool Street Station applicants are requested to submit landscape images only and all images must have a resolution of at least 300dpi and will need to be able to be enlarged to at least A1 in size without pixelation.

For competition details and to submit entries, visit www.exploreculture.org.uk/instaessex.html

 

Alongside the competition and exhibition there will be four photography workshops and a series of social media blogs – more information can be found on the Explore Culture link above.

We are also encouraging the public to take part in the debate by sharing images and thoughts on Essex Culture via Facebook, Instagram and Twitter using the hashtag #InstaEssex.

 

How can museums get involved?

  1. Promote the project to your visitors

As detailed above, the winning images will be displayed at London Liverpool Street Station and across Essex, and it would be fantastic if one (or more!) of those images was of one of our amazing museums, their collections or events.

A digital poster will be available shortly which we’d love for you to print and display and/or circulate to your mailing lists. We’d also appreciate if you can link your site to the project website and mention it on your own social media platforms. Project logos can be downloaded here:

  1. Join in the conversation

Please follow Explore Culture on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter and join the conversation about what is ‘Essex Culture’ is to you. Please do share images of your venue, collections and events, both contemporary and any historic images in your collection which would add an interesting depth (or humour) to the debate.

  1. Write a blog post

As mentioned above, Explore Culture would like to host a series of blog posts discussing the nature of Essex Culture and we are looking for contributors. If you have something to say about what the culture of Essex means to you, please contact helen.griffiths@essex.gov.uk

  1. Enter the competition

Subject to the terms and conditions, staff and volunteers from your venues are very welcome to enter the competition (as individuals, not on behalf of your organisation).
#InstaEssex is managed by Essex County Council’s Cultural team in partnership with Essex & South Suffolk Community Rail Partnership, Network Rail’s Liverpool Street Station, Abellio Greater Anglia. Supported by Thurrock and Southend unitary authorities and the Essex Chronicle.

 

* For the purpose of this competition Essex will be defined as the borders of the 12 Districts, plus Unitary authority areas Southend and Thurrock, for more information to check which areas will be included please click here.

** All entrance fees will go towards the prize money of this competition

Could You Host A LUMeN Placement?

Sarah Allard, Museum Liaison & Student Support Officer introduces their student placement scheme – Leicester University Museum Network (LUMeN).

 

As many of you will know, the School of Museum Studies at the University of Leicester is a world-leading hub for research, teaching, thinking, debate and practice.

As part of our Postgraduate Campus Based taught Programmes, all students are required to complete an eight week placement in a museum, gallery or related institution. By working closely with these museum services we hope to develop projects which give valuable experience to students as well as enable museums to derive tangible practical benefits.  Information on how the scheme works and feedback on recent placements can be found here.

We are always keen to broaden our network of placement providers.  If your museum, gallery or cultural institution has not previously offered a placement but would like to do so we’d be very keen to hear from you. Please contact me at sa563@le.ac.uk to register your interest.

Sign-Up For Summer: Museum Explorer Passport 2016

Museum Explorer

In 2015, a pilot project ran across Bedfordshire, Essex and Hertfordshire. The evaluation of the pilot project has led to some revisions of the original project, which is being run for a second year and expanded to be open to more museums, and to run for a longer period of time. The project has also been simplified and will be accompanied by more direct marketing to provide additional support to participating museums.

 

The project is open to all museums across Hertfordshire, Essex and Bedfordshire who will be offering activities for children during the 2016 May half term and / or summer holidays. There is a fee of £50 to participate in the 2016 project, which will go towards supporting the cost of the project.

Children will be given a Passport and a series (approx. 6) of simple challenges to complete during the summer holidays; e.g. ‘visit a museum you have not been to before’ ‘take part in a workshop involving clay’ Challenges will be open enough to allow children to have a good choice of museums to visit in order to achieve all of them. Each museum listing in the passport with have a blank space where museums will be able to ‘stamp’ the passports when children visit them. There will also be a blank space next to the challenges that can be stamped.

Museums will be provided with everything they need to participate: blank passports, stamps, stickers, flyers and posters, press release template, briefing note (to be shared will all staff and volunteers), and other supporting information. Alongside this will be a programme of marketing via a project specific website, linked to all partner museum websites. Social media will be utilised and museums will be supported to develop their skills in this area. In 2016 we will also advertising in relevant local publications.
Cost
To help support the project, we are asking museums to contribute £50 per site towards the costs. In the 2015 pilot museums received £177 worth of resources and support per site, so this is a good return on your investment!

We can also invoice you in either March or April, depending on which financial year’s budget you would like to use.
Project timetable

  1. Recruit museums to the project

    The deadline for applications is Friday 11th December 2015

     

  2. Website copy

    There are two deadlines for providing information to be included on the website:

    For events in May and June: Friday 22nd April 2016

    For events in July and August: Wednesday 8th June 2016

     

  3. Launch event

    Essex: Monday 25th April

    Herts and Beds: Wednesday 4th May 2016

     

  4. Project goes live!

    The project will be fully live from Saturday 28th May 2016

     

  5. Ongoing promotion

    Via website, social media, listings publications and websites, and museums’ own distribution lists. Each museum will be given a supply of branded stickers for participating children. Events across the May half term holiday and entire summer holidays will be promoted.

  6. Evaluation

    The project will be evaluated by the steering group, which has been expanded from the pilot project to include representation from museums directly. This will take place in September 2016, participating museums will be asked to fill in a short questionnaire and collect minimal data through noting down any anecdotal feedback from your visitors during the project.

To apply, complete this form and email it to me by Friday 11th December.